Today's Takeaways: Greenwald Reacts to Snowden, The West Point Goat, and an Inside Look at the Curse of Busyness

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Thursday, May 29, 2014

A screen shot of Edward Snowden's NBC interview. (NBC)

Glenn Greenwald on Snowden's Latest Revelations | How Farmers Skirt Water Laws in CA | VA Investigation Reveals Delayed Care Is Rampant | The Curious Tradition of the West Point Goat | The Key to Better Sleep: A Digital Detox | The Unrealized Dream of the 3-Hour Work Day

Glenn Greenwald on Snowden's Latest Revelations

The journalist who helped Edward Snowden reveal the NSA's secrets says Snowden sleeps fine at night. And he says John Kerry is sounding like Dick Cheney these days.

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How Farmers Skirt Water Laws in CA

New revelations uncovered by the Center for Investigative Reporting show that farmers who take most of the precious water in California do not want the government looking over their shoulders.

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The Curious Tradition of the West Point Goat

All eyes were on President Obama at the West Point graduation ceremony Wednesday, drawing attention away from the graduating cadets. But one cadet was still singled out for a big cheer. We look at the West Point tradition of honoring the last-ranked graduate, dubbed “the goat.” 

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VA Investigation: Delayed Care Is Rampant

A new report on the VA by the Office of The Inspector General confirms that VA administrators manipulated medical waiting lists at one and possibly more hospitals. The report shows that that similar kinds of manipulation were “systemic throughout” the VA healthcare system.

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The Key to Better Sleep: A Digital Detox

New Tech City Host Manoush Zomorodi and Takeaway Host John Hockenberry compare notes on what they learned and accomplished—or failed to accomplish—while tracking and trying to improve their sleep patterns for WNYC’s Clock Your Sleep Project.

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The Unrealized Dream of the 3-Hour Work Day

Economist John Maynard Keynes once predicted that technological innovation would make the U.S. fantastically wealthy and everyone would enjoy far more leisure time. He was right about one part.

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