Tensions Rise as Russia Tightens Grip on Crimea | Affordable Healthcare? It Depends Where You Live | Fracking Takes Toll on Texas Air

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Monday, March 03, 2014

Soldiers who were among several hundred that took up positions around a Ukrainian military base walk towards their parked vehicles in Crimea on March 2, 2014 in Perevalne, Ukraine. (Sean Gallup/Getty)

Tensions Rise as Russia Tightens Grip on Crimea | Affordable Healthcare? It Depends Where You Live | Fracking Takes Toll on Texas Air | Examining Our Decaying Infrastructure | Literature Offers Lessons For Growing Russian-Ukrainian Crisis | Oscar Pistorius Trial Gets Underway

Russia Demands Crimea Surrender

On Monday, an ultimatum was issued from Russia's Black Sea Fleet and delivered to Ukrainian forces in Crimea—the message from Russian naval forces was to surrender by 5:00 AM local time on Tuesday—or face an all-out assault. Natalia Antelava is in Ukraine reporting for PRI's The World. She provides a look at the rising tensions on the ground in Crimea. Steven Pifer, a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine from 1998 to 2000 and is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, weighs in on the way forward for Ukraine, Russia and the international community. 

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Affordable Healthcare? It Depends Where You Live

You'd expect people in wealthier communities to pay higher premiums, and more moderate or low-income communities to pay lower premiums, but it doesn't always work out that way. Here's why.

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Fracking Takes Toll on Texas Air

Fracking has boomed in Texas, a state with a deep history of oil and energy exploration. While many have profited from the energy boom, hundreds more are finding that the air smells funny, their heads hurt, and their noses are bleeding. But with minimal regulation, and no comprehensive health studies, residents have little recourse. Lisa Song, a reporter for InsideClimate News, explains the health impacts for local residents and the politics at play in the Eagle Ford Shale.

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Literature Offers Lessons For Growing Russian-Ukrainian Crisis

The tensions surrounding Ukraine's relationship with Russia have deep historic origins. Ukraine is a place with a culture and society entirely distinct from that of Russia, and yet one that was intimately familiar. Nowhere is this more evident than the literature of the region. Nikolai Gogol, regarded by many as the “father of Russian literature,” was actually born in what is today part of Ukraine. Anne Lounsbery, Chair of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University, tells The Takeaway what Gogol’s life and writing have to teach us about Russia and Ukraine.

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Today's Highlights | March 03, 2014

Also on Today's Show: The murder trial of South African athlete Oscar Pistorius gets underway Today. The trial is the stuff of global courtroom theater, with the credibility of a criminal justice system, teams of high profile lawyers, and the fate of a celebrity athlete on the line—and all in front of TV cameras...In the summer of 2007 in Minneapolis, there was a disaster on a bridge with no name. It carried 140,000 vehicles per day before it collapsed without warning one hot Wednesday afternoon, killing 13 people.

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