Putin Promises 'Total Annihilation' for Terror Groups | Colorado Retail Marijuana Sales Begin | Making Those New Year's Resolutions Stick

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Thursday, January 02, 2014

Thousands of revelers gather in New York's Times Square to celebrate the ball drop at the annual New Year's Eve celebration on December 31, 2013 in New York. (Getty)

Putin Promises 'Total Annihilation' for Terror Groups | Uighurs Release From Gitmo Signals Possibility for Prison's Closure | Children of South Sudan Caught in Crisis | Supreme Court Halts Contraception Mandate for Religious Groups | Colorado Retail Marijuana Sales Begin | Relearning Language Through Photography | Making Those New Year's Resolutions Stick

Putin Promises 'Total Annihilation' for Terror Groups

In recent days, two suicide bombings have killed 34 people in Russia and raised concerns about a terror campaign that could stretch into the Olympics in February. President Vladimir Putin has vowed to pursue terrorists to their “total annihilation” in his first public comments since the suicide bombings. Joining The Takeaway to explain what's next for Russia is Sufian Zhemukhov, a visiting scholar at George Washington University and expert on U.S.-Caucasus relations.

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Uighurs Release From Gitmo Signals Possibility for Prison's Closure

Earlier this week the military announced the transfer of the three remaining Uighurs from the Guantanamo Bay detention center. The transfer of these prisoners could mark a significant step forward in the closing of the prison. Joining The Takeaway to explain the significance of transferring these men from the prison is Greg Craig, former White House Counsel who was closely involved in the efforts to resolve the Uighurs’ fate.

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Children of South Sudan Caught in Crisis

Thousands of children are believed to have been separated from their families in South Sudan because of the recent fighting in the country, according to the aid agency Save the Children. Fiona McSheehy, Save the Children’s Country Director for South Sudan, discusses the charity's work in two UN compounds in the capital city of Juba, where displaced civilians have sought refuge. 

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Supreme Court Halts Contraception Mandate for Religious Groups

On Tuesday, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor temporarily blocked the Obama administration from forcing some religious-affiliated groups to provide health insurance coverage of birth control or face penalties as part of the Affordable Care Act. Joining The Takeaway to explain what this means for the law is Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the National Constitution Center.

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Colorado Retail Marijuana Sales Begin

In the fall of 2012, Colorado voters approved the use, possession, and sale of small amounts of marijuana for adults above the age of 21. Yesterday that new measure fully took effect with dozens of marijuana retailers opening their doors to recreational customers for the first time. Dennis Huspeni, staff writer at the Denver Business Journal, joins The Takeaway to explain what the first day of business was like.

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Relearning Language Through Photography

More than five years ago, photographer Rachael Jablo developed chronic migraines. As a side effect of the medication she took to help treat those migraines, Jablo developed aphasia which caused her to lose her ability to remember language. Slowly, she was able to speak but could no longer remember certain words to identify simple objects or feelings. Eventually, she came up with the idea of using photography as a way to relearn language.

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Making Those New Year's Resolutions Stick

About 40 percent of Americans make new years resolutions, but just 8 percent actually achieve them. Samantha Henig, digital editor for the New York Times Magazine, has been interviewing a family with an outstanding New Year's resolution track record. Robin Marantz Henig, a freelance science writer for our partner The New York Times, has been looking into the science of new year’s resolutions with the NYU Motivation Lab.

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