Tracing The Lines of Income Disparities Across the U.S. | What Would You Do if You Won the Lottery? | Survival of the Cutest: How We Decide Which Species to Sav

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Wednesday, December 18, 2013

People celebrate a panda's 100-day birth celebration at Chimelong Safari Park on November 7, 2013 in Guangzhou, China. People celebrate a panda's 100-day birth celebration at Chimelong Safari Park on November 7, 2013 in Guangzhou, China. (ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images)

Russia Tries to Thwart Growing Ukrainian Divide | The Meaning Behind Russia's Ukrainian 'Rescue' | Tracing The Lines of Income Disparities Across the U.S. | What Would You Do if You Won the Lottery? | Will an NSA Challenge Reach the Supreme Court? | Survival of the Cutest: How We Decide Which Species to Save | Explaining The Most Complex Mysteries of Our Time

Russia Tries to Thwart Growing Ukrainian Divide

Yesterday, Russian President Vladimir Putin offered Ukraine a massive financial lifeline, agreeing to buy $15 billion of Ukrainian bonds and lower natural gas costs. Zbigniew Brzezinski, former National Security Advisor to President Jimmy Carter, discusses what this means for the Ukraine and Russia's role in the region. Brzezinski is currently a professor at John Hopkins University and a fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

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The Meaning Behind Russia's Ukrainian 'Rescue'

After days of anti-government protests in Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that his country would come to the aid of its neighbor to the tune of $15 billion. But the news of the deal was not enough to send protesters home. Borys Potapenko, Vice Chair of the International Conference in Support of Ukraine, has been closely monitoring the developments in Ukraine from Detroit.

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Tracing Income Disparities Across the U.S.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Census Bureau released the latest data on median household income across the country, we've created an interactive map that allows you to zoom in on the income trends in your neighborhood, block by block.

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What Would You Do if You Won the Lottery?

Last night’s Mega Millions lottery prize hit $636 million. Imagine that you won hundreds of millions of dollars. What would you do with that money? One study shows that many people who win between $50,000 and $150,000 end up going bankrupt. So is coming into so much money so fast a blessing—or a curse in disguise? Susan Bradley, executive director of the Sudden Money Institute, explains the biggest downfalls winners experience.

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Will an NSA Challenge Reach the Supreme Court?

This week a federal judge ruled the National Security Agency's surveillance programs were unconstitutional. What are the odds that a challenge to the NSA's data collection intelligence program will reach the Supreme Court? Pretty good, but how will it get there and when? Adam Liptak, Supreme Court correspondent for our partner The New York Times, joins The Takeaway to explain.

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Survival of the Cutest for Endangered Species

There are all too many endangered species in the wild and precious little money devoted to conservation. So if you had to choose, how would you do it? Not surprisingly, it turns out that animals deemed cute yield bigger donations. This week, NationalGeographic.com is exploring our ideas of conservation in a series called “Last of the Last.” Christine Dell’Amore, news editor for NationalGeographic.com, discusses how we choose which animals to save.

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POLL: Which Species Would You Save?

Scientists say that more than 20,000 plants and animals are on the brink of disappearing forever. How do we decide which species to save? Christine Dell'Amore, News Editor for NationalGeographic.com, will help us answer that question tomorrow. In the meantime, The Takeaway has a challenge for you. Here you'll find three photos of three very different creatures—a giant panda, a grey-faced elephant shrew and an American burying beetle. If you could only save just one, which would you pick? Vote in our poll.

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The Fight to Make Science Apolitical

Brian Cox, a leading British physicist and science broadcaster on the BBC, says scientists need to realize that if they don't step up like Galileo to argue against distortion and myth they will lose the war for truth—even if they win the battle of being correct. "We're trying to understand the natural world and the world that is out there—that has nothing to do with whether you're a Democrat or a Republican," he says. Professor Cox joins The Takeaway to explain why it is so important to make science apolitical. 

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