Greenwald on Snowden Leaks: "Hold Me Accountable" | How to Make $1 Billion in 2014 | Detroit Seeks Help to Save City's Art

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Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Protesters rally against mass surveillance during an event organized by the group Stop Watching Us in Washington, DC on October 26, 2013. (Rena Schild/Shutterstock)

Rep. Tom McClintock: "Congress Should Prosecute James Clapper" | Greenwald on Snowden Leaks: "Hold Me Accountable" | Syrian Refugees Face Harsh Winter Weather | Detroit Seeks Help to Save City's Art | How to Make $1 Billion in 2014 | Despite New Jobs, The Middle Class May Be In Trouble | Sherlock Holmes: The Bridge Between Fiction & Forensics

Greenwald on Snowden Leaks: "Hold Me Accountable"

Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who helped Edward Snowden break news of the NSA’s mas surveillance apparatus, has found himself in the middle one of the year’s biggest news stories. In this second half of a two-part interview with The Takeaway, Greenwald shifts his focus from national security issues to the meaning of responsible journalism. “The public will ultimately judge what it is that I do just like anybody else who’s acting in a way that affects public life, and I think that’s how it should be,” he says.

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Rep. Tom McClintock: "Congress Should Prosecute James Clapper"

NSA officials are mulling a possible amnesty for leaker Edward Snowden. In exchange for the safe return of the rest of the documents he took from the NSA, Snowden could come back to the U.S. and avoid prosecution. The White House yesterday said that it opposes amnesty, while officials in the NSA are split. One supporter of an amnesty deal is Congressman Tom McClintock, a Republican representing California's Fourth District, who joins The Takeaway to discuss a possible deal.

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Transcript: Glenn Greenwald's Takeaway

The Takeaway's Host John Hockenberry talked with Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who worked with leaker Edward Snowden to reveal the cache of classified NSA documents. Being involved with the leaks has forever changed Greenwald’s life. In a special two part interview, The Takeaway talks with Greenwald about everything from the safety of the United States to possible solutions to curb the NSA’s secretive surveillance plans. Here is a transcript of this interview.

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Syrian Refugees Face Harsh Winter Weather

Early winter storms are hitting parts of the Middle East with snow and freezing temperatures. For Syrian refugees, the bitter cold is only exacerbating life in make shift homes and refugee camps. Dr. Hammam Akbik, a Syrian-American doctor who works with refugees, just returned from Jordan last week. He explains the short term challenges ahead for Syrian refugees and the aid workers trying to help them.

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Detroit Seeks Help to Save City's Art

The collection at the Detroit Institute of Arts sits among the top six in America, housing everything from Diego Rivera’s “Detroit Industry” fresco cycle to Vincent van Gogh’s “Self-Portrait.” But in the face of a debt of at least $18 billion, everything is on the table to help pay the city's bills. Dr. A. Paul Schaap, a Detroit philanthropist, joins The Takeaway to discuss what the art is worth to the city and the donor-driven plan to save this piece of the city's culture.

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How to Make $1 Billion

If you had the good luck to play the S&P 500 absolutely perfectly, it would’ve been possible to transform a $1,000 investment into hundreds of billions of dollars in returns. How? David Yanofsky, reporter for Quartz, tells you how.

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Despite New Jobs, Middle Class May Be In Trouble

Over this past year, there were increases in both high-end jobs and low-end service jobs. But the types of jobs that so many Americans rely on—those in the middle market—just aren’t being created. And if that doesn’t change soon, it could spell danger for the economy in 2014 and beyond. Rana Foroohar, Assistant Managing Editor of Time Magazine, lays out the problem—and how it might be solved.

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The Second Life of Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes' love for logic and sharp eye would go on to inspire mystery writers and real-life crime scene investigators alike. A new PBS documentary takes a look how Sherlock Holmes still informs the way we think and investigate real crimes, even today. What is about Holmes that inspires even modern investigators to cautiously and methodically look at the clues in order to solve a crime? Kimberlee Sue Moran, a forensic archaeologist featured in "How Sherlock Changed the World" explains.

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