The 'New Rich' and What It Means to be Wealthy | Desperately Seeking a Cure for Alzheimer's | Digital Volunteers Map Destruction in the Philippines

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Thursday, December 12, 2013

People attend a rally outside of the office of Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) to protest an extension of tax breaks for the wealthiest two percent of Americans on December 2, 2010 in New York City. People attend a rally outside of the office of Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) to protest an extension of tax breaks for the wealthiest two percent of Americans on December 2, 2010 in New York City. (Getty Images)

What is Your Work Worth? | Long-Term Unemployment Difficult to Change | Treating The Injured in the Wake of Typhoon Haiyan | Digital Volunteers Map Destruction in the Philippines | U.S. Cuts Off Non-Lethal Aid to Syrian Rebels | Desperately Seeking a Cure for Alzheimer's | The 'New Rich' and What It Means to be Wealthy

What is Your Work Worth?

Our work determines how we spend most of our days, the people we spend our time with, the kind of lifestyle we can afford, and it influences our fundamental sense of who we are. It turns out that what we're paid and how we really feel about our jobs aren't always in sync. Al Gini, a professor of Business Ethics at Loyola University’s School of Business Administration and resident philosopher at WBEZ, has dedicated much of his career to understanding the value of work. He’s also the author of “My Job My Self." 

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Long-Term Unemployment Difficult to Change

Long-term joblessness is up 213 percent, and some 1.3 million Americans are likely to see their unemployment benefits end this month—Congress has so far failed to include an extension to those benefits in any budget deal. Joining The Takeaway to weigh in on the state of unemployment in the U.S. is Cecilia Rouse, Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and a former member of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.

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Treating The Injured in the Wake of Typhoon Haiyan

Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the Philippines last month, killing nearly 6,000 people and injuring more than 26,000. In the aftermath of the crisis, relief workers headed to the region to try and help millions of people affected by the storm. Dr. Selwyn Mahon, a disaster medicine fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, reflects on his experience in the devastated city of Tacloban.

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Digital Volunteers Map Destruction in the Philippines

New crowdsourcing technologies are bringing humanitarian relief work to anyone with an internet connection. Hundreds of volunteers use the latest satellite photos, news reports, and easy opensource technology to update maps of disaster-affected areas with information about damaged roads and buildings. Dale Kunce is the senior geospatial engineer at the American Red Cross. He joins The Takeaway to explain how a legion of volunteer techies around the world helped with the typhoon relief process in the Philippines.

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U.S. Cuts Off Non-Lethal Aid to Syrian Rebels

The U.S. has long supported the effort that encourages the ouster of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad from power. Yesterday, the Obama administration announced that it would stop sending nonlethal aid—like food and medical supplies—to the moderate opposition in Syria, at least temporarily. Andrew Tabler, a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and author of "In The Lion's Den: An Eyewitness account of Washington's Battle with Syria," joins The Takeaway to discuss these latest developments.

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Desperately Seeking a Cure for Alzheimer's

More than 5 million Americans suffer with Alzheimer’s disease and by 2050 that number is expected to nearly triple. All this week, our partner WGBH has been exploring efforts by leading researchers in labs around the country who are trying to find better treatments and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer's disease. The Takeaway talks with WGBH and WCAI senior reporter and editor, Sean Corcoran about his series: "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."    

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The 'New Rich' and What It Means to be Wealthy

"A lot of these people are people who had one good year," says Harvard Business Professor Michael Norton on Americans considered "rich."

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Wayne Polak

Who was the artist that sang the acoustical version of the song "If I were a Rich Man" from FIddler on the Roof in your piece The 'New Rich' and What It Means to be Wealthy?

Dec. 12 2013 11:11 PM

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