U.S. Military Makes Landfall in Philippines | Negotiating Lasting Peace In Syria | Stories of Living in a Paycheck to Paycheck World

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Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Rebel fighters hold a position in a damaged building during clashes with Syrian government forces in the northeastern city of Deir Ezzor, on November 11, 2013. (AHMAD ABOUD/AFP/Getty)

Planning Relief Efforts in the Philippines | U.S. Military Makes Landfall in Philippines | A Worldwide View of Storm Surges In One Map | Considering the Caribbean: Possible Effects of Rising Sea Levels in Our Backyard | Your Stories of Living in a Paycheck to Paycheck World | Negotiating Lasting Peace In Syria: Lessons From Bosnia & Kosovo | Designing Networks for Answers in Syria

Planning Relief Efforts in the Philippines

As horrific as typhoon Haiyan's impact has been on the Philippines, it’s not the first time a typhoon of great magnitude has hit the region. After years in the field, disaster management experts have developed a complex set of protocols for deploying help in the days and weeks after a major natural disaster like this one. Bob Kitchen, the International Rescue Committee’s Director of Emergency Preparedness, explains some of the procedures his organization follows in situations like this.

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U.S. Military Makes Landfall in Philippines

In the days and weeks of the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, America will likely be the strongest international presence in the region. But the U.S. and the Philippines have a long history, a relationship once largely represented by one of America’s main overseas military bases—Subic Bay. Joining The Takeaway to explain the how the U.S. will assist in the relief effort is Dr. Ronald Ratcliff, professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College and a retired Navy Captain who spent some time in the Philippines during his service.

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A Worldwide View of Storm Surges In One Map

There are all sorts of humanitarian and relief efforts that happen in hard-hit countries after disasters like Typhoon Haiyan. But not all disasters have equally damaging effects. The storm surge from Typhoon Haiyan reached as high as 23 feet and in some places sea water churned up by the storm far exceeded that. James K. Mitchell, a professor of geography at Rutgers University, joins The Takeaway to explain how storm surge makes natural disasters riskier.

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Considering the Caribbean: Possible Effects of Rising Sea Levels in Our Backyard

Last week's tsunami-like surge in the Philippines might be far away, but there's another vulnerable coast line right in our backyard: The Caribbean. Rising sea levels could have considerable effects on the Caribbean islands, profoundly impacting tourism and immigration. Member station WLRN in Miami is running a week-long series on the impact of sea level rise. WLRN Reporter Tim Padgett joins us to discuss his report on the projections for the Caribbean.

 

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Stories of Living in a Paycheck to Paycheck World

Roughly three-quarters of Americans are living paycheck-to-paycheck, with little to no emergency savings. We asked about the days of the month that are better or worse for your budget, and about the rhythm of the checks that come in and out of your bank account. Listener Katrina Paschal works in health care administration in Rockford, Illinois—a city with a 13 percent unemployment rate. She is lucky to have a job, but she still lives paycheck to paycheck.

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Negotiating Lasting Peace In Syria: Lessons From Bosnia & Kosovo

Efforts to end the long-running conflict in Syria have proved elusive. Retired Ambassador Wolfgang Petritsch was the European Union’s chief negotiator at the Kosovo Peace Agreement talks and, as former high representative of the international community for Bosnia and Herzegovina, he also oversaw implementation of the Bosnia peace accords. The Takeaway talks with Petritsch about the potential for securing peace in Syria.

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Designing Networks for Answers in Syria

Is there another way to approach intervention in Syria, and can answers be found in the real time networks of individuals making decisions on the ground? Alexa Courtney is the executive vice president of Caerus Associates. According to Courtney, designing tools to access localized Syrian networks are what gives the group an ear to quality information, that in turn can be used by policy makers to make quality decisions about U.S. action.

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