Recovery Effort Underway in the Philippines | Supreme Court to Hear Two Pivotal Union Cases | Uncertain Future for the 47 Million Who Rely on Food Stamps

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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

A girl pays for her mother's groceries using Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) tokens, more commonly known as Food Stamps, at the GrowNYC Greenmarket in Union Square on September 18, 2013 in NYC. (Andrew Burton/Getty)

Rescue & Recovery Effort Underway in the Philippines | Recovery, Democracy & Corruption in the Philippines | Supreme Court to Hear Two Pivotal Union Cases | Lessons From the 2003 Northeast Blackout | An Uncertain Future for the 47 Million Who Rely on Food Stamps | Food Banks, Families & Fiscal Assistance: The Faces of America's Hungry | In Meat We Trust: America's Historic Relationship with Meat

Rescue & Recovery Effort Underway in the Philippines

Today The Takeaway examines the on the ground efforts happening in the hardest hit areas of the Philippines with Austin Ramzy, reporter for our partner The New York Times. Ramzy is currently in Cebu City, Philippines. Orla Fagan, Humanitarian Affairs Officer with the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, is in the Filipino capital of Manila. She joins the program to explain the U.N. rescue and recovery effort.

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Relief, Democracy & Corruption in the Philippines

Adding to Super Typhoon Haiyan's damage is a long-standing problem that stems from a government plagued with inefficiencies and a history of corruption. Richard Chu is an Associate Professor of Philippine Colonial History, Pacific Empires, and Asian-Pacific America at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst. Chu, who was born and raised in the Philippines, explains how the country's long history of corruption will play out in the relief effort.

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Supreme Court to Hear Two Pivotal Union Cases

The Supreme Court will hear arguments today over a strategy commonly used by unions to organize workers. The practice involves pressuring an employer to sign a "neutrality agreement." This case is just one of two major organized labor disputes the Court is scheduled to hear. The other involves a worker who objected to being asked to pay fees to a union she didn't support. Benjamin Sachs, a Harvard Law School professor, explains the legal arguments in both cases.

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Lessons From the 2003 Northeast Blackout

In 2003, a great blackout left nearly 50 million Americans from Ohio to New York without electricity. This week, more than 200 public and private large power companies are staging a mock-blackout. They won’t turn any lights out. But they will rehearse how they would respond in the event of another major outage. Jonathan Gruber, Retro Report Director takes a look back at the lessons of 2003's outage.

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An Uncertain Future for the 47 Million Who Rely on Food Stamps

As part of the $500 billion farm bill, Congress has agreed to slash funding for the Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program (SNAP), better known as food stamps. For the 47 million Americans who rely on SNAP, the fiscal squeeze on food stamps is already being felt at home. On November 1, food stamps allocations were trimmed by as much as $36 a month for a family of four. Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich breaks down the political jockeying over food stamps.

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Food Banks, Families & Fiscal Assistance: The Faces of America's Hungry

The number of Americans enrolled in food stamps has soared by 70 percent since the economic crisis began in 2008, and now the program faces the largest cut in its nearly 50-year history. Rafaela Rivera, a 35-year-old home health aid who recently lost her job and experienced food stamps cuts, has two children and takes care of her disabled husband who is unable to work. Christopher Bean, the director of Part of the Solution food pantry in New York City, explains what impact the cuts will have on his local organization.

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In Meat We Trust: America's Historic Relationship with Meat

Americans consume about 275 lbs of meat annually per person—that's more than three times the global average. In her new book, “In Meat We Trust: An Unexpected History of Carnivore America,” author Maureen Ogle traces Americans' relationship with meat through the ages, from the days when early settlers used livestock to claim land, to the 20th century rise of big producers like Tyson and Purdue and present day calls for a return to locally-sourced, organic meat.

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