Ira Flatow on Extreme Weather One Year After Sandy | Britain Seeks to Stop The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks | Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future

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Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Destroyed beach house in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on November 4, 2012 in Far Rockaway, NY (Shutterstock)

A Look at The Federal Response to Sandy | In the Face of Disaster, Would You Stay? | Britain Seeks to Prevent The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks | As U.S. Changes Foreign Policy Priorities, Will Egypt be Left Behind? | Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future | Science Friday's Ira Flatow on Extreme Weather One Year After Sandy

HUD Secretary Donovan Reflects On Sandy's First Anniversary

One year ago this week, Sandy devastated the Eastern Seaboard, leaving at least 117 dead, thousands homeless and an estimated $65 billion in damage. President Barack Obama appointed Shaun Donovan, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, to lead the federal response to Sandy. Secretary Donovan examines Sandy's impact, and discusses the state of the recovery effort one year later. 

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In the Face of Disaster, Would You Stay?

It’s been one year since Hurricane Sandy struck the fragile coasts of the New York and New Jersey, but it sometimes seems that the anniversary of one disaster is never far from another. But through the most difficult of times, there exists the shared experience of the people, and specifically the people who stay. That’s the subject of photojournalist Michael Forster Rothbart’s new TED book called “Would You Stay?”

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Britain Seeks to Prevent The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks

British Prime Minister David Cameron appears ready to crack down on The Guardian, the news organization at the center of the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's leaks. Louise Mensch is a former conservative member of Parliament. She's called for the government to crack down on The Guardian from the beginning. She explains her stance against The Guardian, and how she hopes the Snowden saga will finally end. 

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Parts of Texas Abortion Law Blocked by Judge

In Texas, a restrictive new abortion law will go into effect today—but not without some last minute changes. Yesterday, just hours before the new law was set to go into effect, a federal judge blocked a key part of the abortion law and handed a partial victory to abortion rights advocates. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the changes to the law is  Veronica Zaragovia, who has been covering this story for KUT Austin.

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As U.S. Changes Foreign Policy Priorities, Will Egypt be Left Behind?

In a speech to the United Nations General Assembly last month, President Barack Obama laid down a new set of foreign policy priorities. The Arab-Israeli conflict made the cut, as did mitigating the civil war in Syria. Noticeably missing from the president’s list of top priorities was Egypt, a crucial and long held U.S. ally in the Middle East. Michael Wahid Hanna, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation, weighs in on the changing dynamics between the two countries.

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Young Egyptians Discuss Their Country's Future

Mohammed Mubarak, a 27-year-old architect who recently completed his military service in the Egyptian military, and Mohga Morsy, a 23-year-old lawyer, are both visiting the U.S. as Shafik Gabr Fellows. The program invites young leaders to travel to Egypt and the U.S. to promote cross cultural understanding. Together Mubarak and Morsy provide their outlook for Egypt's future and the way forward during this period of great uncertainty.

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Science Friday's Ira Flatow on Extreme Weather One Year After Sandy

While the science behind climate change may still be controversial in some circles, it's come increasingly difficult to deny that the planet is growing warmer. And though scientists are cautious when it comes to cause and effect, most experts agree there is a link between climate change and storms like Hurricane Sandy. Science Friday's Ira Flatow examines the lessons learned, and the link between climate change and extreme weather. 

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