Terror Watch Lists Brand Hundreds of Thousands

Monday, December 02, 2013

A traveler undergoes an enhanced pat down by a Transportation Security Administration agent at the Denver International Airport on November 22, 2010 in Denver, Colorado. (John Moore/Getty)

There are at least 700,000 people designated on the U.S. terror watch list.

The government doesn't reveal who they are, or why they've been marked as a potential threat, but we do know it’s a number that’s grown considerably over the last few years. The number of people who appear on the list rose sharply after the failed Christmas Day bombing in 2009, and peaked at nearly 1,000,000 that very same year.

For the many individuals branded with the terrorist label, it can be nearly impossible to challenge the designation. It's a watch list that very few people are actually watching.

Joining The Takeaway to explain is Anya Bernstein, associate professor at the SUNY Buffalo Law School and author of “The Hidden Costs of Terrorist Watch Lists.”

Guests:

Anya Bernstein

Produced by:

Ellen Frankman

Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [4]

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Feb. 22 2014 02:15 AM
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Dec. 13 2013 01:21 AM
Victor

I'm on terrorist watch list since 2010 for working on my prosthetic legs. It would be nice if we were told by our gov that if we do certain legal things then we treated like terrorists.

What article is not mentioned is that we potential terrorists are tortured around o clock wth cutting edge technologies, like Navy Yard Shooter.

US Gov is the one most evil thing that our world ever witnessed, it is even worse than Nazi germany.

Dec. 02 2013 06:07 PM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

How many Agents are monitoring the 700,000 people on the Watch list? Sounds like a secure job, with not much to do.

Dec. 02 2013 11:43 AM

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