Should Starbucks Ban Guns From Its Coffee Shops?

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Starbucks says guns are no longer welcome in its cafes, though it is stopping short of an outright ban on firearms.

The coffee chain moved away from its neutral stance on guns in its stores Wednesday, publicly requesting that customers not bring weapons into its coffee shops.

The company's CEO Howard Schultz says customers who bring in guns will still be served and won't be asked to leave.

"Starbucks is not a policy maker," Schultz says, adding the company is not pro- or anti-gun, but believes that weapons "should not be part of the Starbucks experience."

The Takeaway wants to hear from you. Do you agree or disagree with this policy? Take our mini poll here.


Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [6]

Tom from Ashland, OR

The people that need gun control the most are our police. More and more I see our municipal police forces becoming more and more militarized and less and less educated and trained to deal with the public. This spring an 11 year old girl who was naked and out for a walk (she has autism) was tasered by a cop just a quater mile from my home. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QVreNbHEXM The police in many European countries don't carry guns. Here in the US police are regularly vindicated after making really poor decisions that result in injury and death of innocent people. I don't feel that the majority of police officers are mentally capable of doing their job. I don't feel safe in their presence. I would never call an officer if I were threatened. I carry a gun. I have a lot of training. I will protect myself from anyone determined to do me harm. Taking guns away from law abiding citizens in not addressing the problem in this country. It is just another example of how we continue to treat the symptoms of a sick society. The problems here in the USA are poverty, and the out of balance distribution of wealth that cause the poverty. When the American dream of being rewarded fairly for hard work returns and people quit doing whatever they need to, to survive, we will see gun violence and violence in general drop to the level of most European countries.

Sep. 19 2013 01:54 PM
Teri from Perkasie, PA

I will SUPPORT Starbucks by buying more coffee. My hope is that Starbucks will be the lead that other reasonable companies (and Americans) will follow!
Justice Ginsbuprg is right; there is a preamble to the second amendment that seems to be conveniently forgotten!
Thanks!

Sep. 19 2013 12:49 PM

THANK YOU Starbucks FOR ENCOURAGING CONCEALED-CARRY

Sep. 19 2013 12:16 PM
RUCB_Alum from Central New Jersey

Asking their customers not to do something is NOT a ban! Starbucks has no power to ban what is otherwise lawful behavior.

With the current make-up of SCOTUS, it is only a matter of time where the clause "...keep and bear arms..." is used to eliminate ALL non-concealed carry laws. It's the most logically consistent position.

If you don't want to see everyone carrying a gun, get to work and amend the Second Amendment.

Sep. 19 2013 10:24 AM
Ben Madden from Seattle, WA

This is ripe fodder for a new Dirty Harry movie:

I know what you're thinking, punk. You're thinking "did he do six espresso shots or only five? ... you've gotta ask yourself a question: "Do I feel latte?" Well, do ya, punk?

Sep. 18 2013 07:50 PM
RAOUL ORNELAS from BEND, OREGON

This is why I don't buy my coffee at Starbucks anymore. Mr. Schultz is more interested in money than sanity or saving lives. A mass shooting at Starbucks is in the making. Apparently Mr. Schultz believes people carrying guns in his coffee house is some sort of NRA guarantee against preventing violence. Anytime a see a person carrying a gun into any restaurant or public space that I happen to be in, I am out of the place pronto especially in Iowa where blind people are allowed to carry guns. I am disappointed with Mr. Schultz's decision.

Sep. 18 2013 06:59 PM

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