Senator Bernie Sanders Weighs In on the Latest NSA Spying Scandal

Monday, October 28, 2013

Senator Bernie Sanders (Dale Robbins Moyers & Company/Facebook)

The outrage continues over revelations that the NSA has spied on some of America’s closest allies. Members of European Parliament will travel to Washington today for a three-day visit—they are likely to press senior U.S. intelligence officials for more information regarding the organization's alleged spying.

The Obama administration has promised to review NSA policies, and the president called German Chancellor Angela Merkel to apologize on Oct. 23, saying that he would have stopped the alleged spying had he known about it.

"We are reviewing the way that we gather intelligence to ensure that we properly balance the security concerns of our citizens and allies with the privacy concerns that all people share,” explained Jay Carney, the White House press secretary.

Senator Bernie Sanders, an Independent from Vermont, joins The Takeaway to explain the fallout and what can be done to rein in the NSA.

Guests:

Bernie Sanders

Produced by:

Tyler Adams

Comments [3]

steve schilling from utah

he says that "if they cannot make the case, lets not store the phone records" more B.S word play that still implies it is okay to tap those 99.9%
this man truly is B.S.

Oct. 28 2013 03:15 PM
Keith from MN

I am actually so tired of hearing about the "pretended" outrage, especially by politicians on this topic. The only reason that the US is being put on the spot is because of the Snowden releases. Who is to say that Germany hasn't wiretapped President Obama's cellphone. In fact, my view is that all of the countries are listening in on eachother anyway. Get past the pretended outrage and start having a real conversation.

Oct. 28 2013 02:56 PM
Marion from RI

Bernie, you are the best! One of the greatest US Senators ever & we so need more leaders like you. The NSA is truly out of control with spying on US citizens and our allies.

Oct. 28 2013 11:57 AM

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