Refugees Suffer as Fighting in Syria Drags On

Monday, October 21, 2013

Children inside a classroom at Za’atri refugee camp, host to tens of thousands of Syrians displaced by conflict, near Mafraq, Jordan. December 7, 2012 (United Nations/Mark Garten/flickr)

As fighting drags on in Syria, government officials continue to push for long-postponed peace talks between the divided Syrian opposition and the regime of Syrian President Bashar al –Assad.

But with no tangible peace process in sight, the Syrian people continue to pay the high costs of war. 

It’s a crisis that has caused more than 6 million Syrians to flee the country or be displaced within their own nation—there's now a flood of refugees whose suffering spills over daily into countries throughout the region.

And now the World Health Organization says it's received reports of a suspected polio outbreak in Syria. In Damascus, the Ministry of Public Health is launching an urgent response, but there's concern the disease will be hard to control amid civil unrest. 

Joining The Takeaway to discuss the crisis in Syria is David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee and Britain’s former Foreign Secretary.

Guests:

David Miliband

Produced by:

Ellen Frankman

Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [2]

Jean Marie Offenbacher from Manhatten

Syria has had major cities for over 5000 years...the commentator confused Syria with the Gulf States when he referred to it as just becoming urbanized in the 1930s. Such stereotypes and confusion with less developed cultures mask the magnitude of the tragedy in Syria. These are not people who are accustomed to living in tents.

Oct. 21 2013 03:33 PM
Stephen Hopkins from London UK

What concerns me and makes me increasingly glad that western states haven't become militarily involved is the increasing evidence of Al-Kaida involvement in the opposition in this civil war.

Oct. 21 2013 01:26 PM

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