The Places That Allow Us to Build and Dream

Friday, November 08, 2013

Portrait taken on June 3, 2013, of Lorna Simpson, US photographer and videographer, who is exhibiting her work until September 1, 2013 at the Jeu de Paume in Paris. (PIERRE ANDRIEU/AFP/Getty)

Consider your creative instincts: The work you do, the stories you tell yourself, the words you type out, and the photos you take everyday.

How much are they all informed by your surroundings—both big and small? From your personal office or studio, to the landscape outside your window, where does your creativity begin and your surroundings end?

"Art Studio America: Contemporary Artist Spaces" is a new book that explores these questions, contrasting intimate visits to artist studios with explorations of America’s landscapes.

It features the images and thoughts of 115 artists active today, including Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Bill Viola, Marina Abramovic, and the great film and video artist Lorna Simpson, who joins us today.

Also with us, the editor and interviewer of “Art Studio America,” Hossein Amirsadeghi.

Guests:

Hossein Amirsadeghi and Lorna Simpson

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer

Comments [1]

Oscar Maldonado from Ny

To build an artist first it has to be a master and popular at the age before 14 with tears luck and pressure..than you discipline everything around you and yourself... After you do your best work while crazy in love.. Than you learn to understand politics "people" and god than if The Lord likes you he can give you time to do some more..I can go on forever but I do know that every empire needs to breed a master artist it also can be the catalyst of the universe..the lord can make an artist even higher than a prophet..this is who we are..
http://i42.tinypic.com/hsjhwm.jpg
I saw this in a dream, Moses was there, its a 911 oils by Oscar 04

Nov. 08 2013 03:43 PM

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