Furloughed Federal Worker Speaks Out on Government Shutdown

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

As many as 800,000 federal workers are being sent home because of the government shutdown. (Shutterstock)

Working for the government used to mean job security, but that's not the case for about 800,000 federal workers who are now furloughed because of the government shutdown.

These workers are unsure when they will return to work or receive a pay check. 

Chris Butler is an electronics technician for the Navy and the Vice President of IFPTE, the International Federation of Professional & Technical Engineers. He joins The Takeaway to discuss how he prepared for the furlough and how he and his family will cope going forward. 

Guests:

Chris Butler

Produced by:

Megan Quellhorst

Comments [2]

Charles

Union boss Chris Butler:

http://www.ifpte.com/

Oct. 01 2013 09:50 AM
Charles

So of all of the people whom The Takeaway could interview among the civilian work force in the federal government, The Takeaway chooses the one guy who is a professional advocate. A more or less full time political spinmaster from a Washington D.C. public employee union.

I went to the IFPTE website; it's just what you'd expect. Partisan advocacy galore.

And I see that Mr. Butler's daughter got a union-sponsored scholarship for her collegiate costs, per a simple Google search of Chris Butler's name.

And through all of this, John Hockenberry doesn't really interview the guest so much as he directs Mr. Butler through a direct examination designed to attack Republicans in Congress.

This interview, and the production thereof, belongs in the hall of fame for public radio's partisan bias.

Oct. 01 2013 09:48 AM

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