Event: WNYC Science Fair

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The Takeaway's host John Hockenberry. (Marcoantonio.com)

Join our host John Hockenberry for an evening of music, drinks and conversation with two of the brightest lights in the mind-bending, down-the-rabbit hole world of codebreaking on February 11 at 7:00 PM.

Tal Rabin, head of the Cryptography Research Group at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, dabbles in number theory, theory of algorithms, and distributed systems. But her real focus is on designing efficient and provably secure cryptographic algorithms for network security systems.

John Rinn, once named in Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10,” is assistant professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology at Harvard University and Medical School and senior associate member of the Broad Institute. He conducts research aimed at understanding the role of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in establishing the distinct epigenetic states of adult and embryonic cells and their misregulation in diseases such as cancer. In a past life he was a snowboarder, and he swears the two paths are linked.

Neal Weiner is associate professor at the Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics at New York University. In his words: "My research focuses on physics beyond the standard model, in whatever form that takes. Some of the broad questions I consider are: Why is gravity so weak compared to other forces? What makes up the missing matter and energy of the universe? What signs could arise from dark matter in the galaxy, and what theories might explain interesting signatures already observed?"  

One Ring Zero is led by Michael Hearst and Joshua Camp. The band has released eight albums, including As Smart As We Are: The Author Project, featuring lyrics by Paul Auster, Margaret Atwood, Dave Eggers, and Neil Gaiman, among others; Planets, a collection of new compositions that represent the solar system and beyond; and their most recent, The Recipe Project, in which the band has taken recipes from today’s top chefs (Mario Batali, Tom Colicchio, David Chang, etc.), set them to music, and sung them word for word. One Ring Zero has performed at music venues and cultural institutions including the Whitney Museum of Art, Central Park Summer Stage, The Kennedy Center, Toronto’s Harbourfront Centre, Spring Scream in Taiwan, Era in Tokyo, New Morning in Paris, The Chicago World Music Festival, and the Fundacion Principe de Asturia in Spain. The band’s music has been featured in dance concerts, films, television, animations, fashion shows, and NPR programming including This American Life, Fresh Air, and Morning Edition.

This is the second edition of the WNYC Science Fair, a new series in The Greene Space that mixes your favorite public radio personalities with popular science, special performances with a few drinks.

Buy Tickets Here

Get a peek inside IBM's Watson Research Center with the head of the Cryptography Research Group Tal Rabin.
Join us live in The Greene Space on Feb. 11 for WNYC Science Fair: The Codebreakers, hosted by John Hockenberry. Tickets and live video webcast info here: http://bit.ly/1cEcVPM

Check out the video below to get a peek inside IBM's Watson Research Center with Tal Rabin. See a video from from WNYC's last Science Fair event here.

Comments [3]

Alan J. Cohen, M.D. from Berkeley, California

There is a fantastic book written by Leo Marks, a brilliant code specialist who worked in the SOE, having been overlooked by Bletchley Park. It's called "Between Silk and Cyanide"-a reference to two of the various methods SOE agents relied upon to do their undercover work in Nazi-occupied Europe. The silk was a clever technique to transport code in a fashion-literally-wrapped close to the body(so that Gestapo searchers couldn't easily detect the rustling paper that codes were written upon). The cyanide-well-if things didn't go as planned....
Marks' humor , combined with his sharp intellect and suspenseful writing style, made this an very exciting read. It took a little getting used to the British parlance and dry humor in the beginning, but after that , I couldn't put it down. Understanding the role these men and women played behind the scenes, and the incredible risks they took, is inspiring. The Nazis were particularly cruel in meting out punishment to these spies, as one who is knowledgeable of the era, can only imagine.

Feb. 11 2014 04:07 PM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn, N.Y.

Sounds like a great pick up joint. The messages sent between people will be read between the lines.

Feb. 11 2014 02:24 PM
Larry Fisher from Brooklyn,N.Y.

research aimed at understanding the role of long intergenic non-coding RNAs is sexy and the perfect place to bring a pre- Coding Valentine.
If only I wasn't working that night, I would have loved to get all cryptic with you guys.

Feb. 07 2014 03:47 PM

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