The Doctor Will See (All Of) You Now

Thursday, September 19, 2013

We’ve all been to the doctor, and we all know how it goes. Check in with the receptionist, sit in the waiting room, and then after some time, meet one-on-one with the doctor for a few minutes.

But imagine that the scenario is slightly different.

You still check in and sit in the waiting room. But rather than meet one-on-one with the doctor when your name is called, you meet with the doctor and several other patients. You and the other patients talk about your symptoms together. You get advice from the doctor together. Yes, you even get examined together.

For those of us who are used to traditional doctors visits, this might sound like a nightmare. But more and more doctors are seeing their patients in groups these days. Today, 13 percent of medical practices have the option of group doctor visits.

Dr. Alexander Kuo, a professor of medicine and director of hepatology at University of California-San Diego. He uses the group visit method with his transplant patients at the UC-San Diego Clinic.

But Rabeh M.A. Soofi isn't sure group doctor visits are such a good idea. She's an attorney who handles privacy cases in Los Angeles.

They join The Takeaway to discuss the trend of group medical visits.

Guests:

Alexander Kuo, MD

Produced by:

Katie Hiler and Kristen Meinzer

Editors:

T.J. Raphael

Comments [1]

Laurie Jurkiewicz

Al. Group models of care are not the same. For the past 12 years as a midwife, I have been doing Centering Pregnancy, a group model of prenatal care. This was the brainchild of midwife, Sharon Schindler Rising. This model uses peer based learning, self care and provides support. There has been lots of research done on this model. An RCT published in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology showed a decrease in preterm birth of 33% for patients in Centering compared to traditional care. If thie intervention was a pill or technology every pregnant women would have it and insurance would be paying for it. It is not about efficiency necessarily, it's about quality. Getting people together to connect on common health challenges just seems like good sense to me.

Sep. 19 2013 04:09 PM

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