Un-Paving Paradise: A Plan For Empty Car Dealership Lots

What happens to all those now-empty car dealer lots?

Monday, May 18, 2009

This weekend, 1,100 auto-dealership owners across the country took in the sobering news that their contracts with GM will disappear in the auto maker's reorganization. A huge blow to the dealers who will be losing their livelihoods, the closings also raise the question of what to do with all the shuttered car dealerships. Most cities have at least one strip of town dedicated to car-dealer row. So what will happen when the dealers close up shop? For a few ideas we turn to Ellen Durham-Jones, Director of the Architecture Program at Georgia Tech and co-author of Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs.

Guests:

Ellen Dunham-Jones

Hosted by:

Andrea Bernstein

Contributors:

Jen Poyant

Comments [5]

John Hodges

Great idea, Mike. Jon

May. 20 2009 04:33 PM
mary

i would love to see the overdevelopment unpaved and turned green again!! we need more completely undeveloped land where animals, insects and birds can live undisturbed. i am tired of seeing coyotes close to town and dead animals on the road.

May. 19 2009 11:02 PM
Mike Ciriello

...abandoned buildings could also house hot-houses and training facilities for agriculture-related businesses: nursery management; bio-tech/agri--pharmaceutical R & D (using plants to create meds); food production, etc..

Mike Ciriello
MLA, NC State University

May. 18 2009 11:52 AM
Mike Ciriello

Return abandoned inner-city neighborhoods to farm land. Retrofit abandoned factories into processing facilities for food. Utilize existing railroad track to ship OUT to the suburbs.

May. 18 2009 11:42 AM
Nik

Use them as training centers for at-risk youth and unemployed youth & adults for auto repair/restoration courses, business & salesmanship classes, entrepreneur training & mentoring--using the former dealership employees as the teachers/trainers.

May. 18 2009 10:02 AM

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