Remembering Eisenhower, Looking Ahead at the Future of the GOP

Friday, October 29, 2010

Dwight D. Eisenhower was the 34th President of the United States. During his two terms, he enlarged Social Security, signed the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, and declared racial discrimination a national security issue. And, of course, before all that, he was a five-star general in the United States Army and Supreme Commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II.

Widely considered a great president and a great Republican, many people still can’t help but like Ike.

And if his grandson David has anything to do with it, they’ll continue to like him for a lot longer. David Eisenhower is, along with his wife Julie Nixon Eisenhower, the author of “Going Home to Glory: A Memoir of Life with Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1961-1969.

If Ms. Eisenhower's last name sounds familiar, it’s because she’s the younger daughter of a man you may also have heard of: Ike’s vice president, Richard M. Nixon. 

They join us to talk about their new book and their memories of Ike.


Below, two campaign songs and record labels from Eisenhower's re-election campaign, in 1956:

Eisenhower campaign song: "I Go with I-K-E"

Eisenhower campaign song: "Hike with Ike"

WNYC Archives/WNYC
Record label for "I Go For I-K-E"
WNYC Archive Collections/WNYC
Record label for "Hike with Ike"
WNYC Archives/WNYC
Record label for "Sound Off for Eisenhower"
WNYC Archives/WNYC
Record label for "Eisenhower Victory March"
WNYC Archives/WNYC
Record label for "Get Out and Fight For Ike"

Guests:

David Eisenhower and Julie Nixon Eisenhower

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer

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