Indianans with health care concerns on Sen. Tom Daschle

Thursday, January 08, 2009

The Takeaway talks to two residents of Dublin, Indiana, who met with former U.S. senator Tom Daschle, D-S.D., the likely Health and Human Services secretary in President-elect Barack Obama's Cabinet. Health care concerns are always on the mind of Jill King, a homemaker with breast and uterine cancer, and Travis Ulerick, an emergency medical technician. They give us their take on the senator's fitness for the job at hand.

Guests:

Jill King and Travis Ulerich

Contributors:

Noel King and Nadia Zonis

Comments [2]

APPLEBLOSSOM

MY HOPES FOR HEALTH CARE POLICY:
1. Any drug coverage will use the same procedures the VA (Veterans' Affairs) system uses as regards pricing of medications. The way they farm out provision of supplies to private companies is a horror and should not be copied.
2. Reintroduce federal loans for undergraduate nursing students, with up to 5 years' forgiveness. I don't know why this hasn't happened yet. It's how I funded my generic undergraduate degree at NYU in the 70's. P.S. I will be retiring soon, as are the most experienced Nursing professionals.

Jan. 08 2009 09:23 AM
Rick

Don't expect healthcare "reform" as long as the Obama team is advised by the same *hen house foxes* who designed the MA mandatory health insurance law. Included are Blue Cross/Blue Shield who with richly for profit Partners Healthcare conspired in a hand shake deal to drive up the cost of health care in Massachusetts (http://preview.tinyurl.com/7hmj3s).

The facts to remember when considering health care "reform" in the US is that per person Americans spend almost $7000 per year on health care which is almost double what other OECD industrial nations WITH universal health insurance spend (http://preview.tinyurl.com/32j8mb).

This suggests we could cover everyone while spending less than what we spend leaving 47 million uninsured and millions others "underinsured".

Jan. 08 2009 08:04 AM

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