Chinese Dissidents Celebrate Liu Xiaobo's Nobel Peace Prize

Friday, October 08, 2010

We continue our coverage of Liu Xiaobo, the imprisoned Chinese dissident who was announced this morning as the winner of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. To learn more about Liu, we speak with a man who has known him for over 20 years. Wan Yanhai directs an AIDS awareness group, and was jailed in his home country of China three times in the past 12 years. He fled to Washington, D.C. earlier this year, and has been celebrating Liu's honor all morning.

Guests:

Yanhai Wan

Comments [2]

kiki Sembos from New Jersey

Yia sou, Mr. Retsos;
You said it! Liu Xiaobo , no man of peace, defended G.W. Bush's war on Iraq, believes that the U.S. should not hesitate to use force anywhere in order to prevent another 9/11. But, when persons like Kissinger,Walesa and Le Duc Tho get that prize it appears that the prize goes to who has the best suggestions for and did their best to be 'bloodsuck or the year'.And, you'er right about those who didn't win it.

Nov. 30 2010 01:40 PM
Nikos Retsos from Chicago, Illinois

Liu Xiaobo is lucky to be Chinese, and the U.S. through its influence on who gets the Nobel and who doesn't, want to stick it to China through Norway. Would Liu Xiaobo have gotten a Nobel Peace Prize if he were an Egyptian dissident? How many Egyptian dissidents languish in prison in Egypt - under worse prison conditions, and under a police famous for torturing prisoners. Well, it is hush-hush for dissidents under our puppet regimes, and Nobels for dissidents under our foes! Has the Egyptian cleric Abu Omar, who was kidnapped in Italy by the CIA, and turned over to Egypt who tortured him, gotten a Nobel? What about the thousands of dissidents in Saudi jails? Aren't they humans? The fact is that our Norwegian friends have transformed the Nobel Prize process into "a Nobel Award Mill" to help us and mud-sling our foes!

The award of the Peace prize to Liu Xiaobo, therefore, is a nice way to undermine China, the greatest threat to the U.S. in Asia. Any dissident who helps portray countries antagonizing the U.S. as brutal is eligible, and many have gotten Nobel Peace prizes. Did any Latin American
dissident of the U.S. dictators in Latin America ever receive a Nobel Peace Prize? No, they were all exterminated by CIA trained and funded “Death Squads." Did Mao Tse-Tung, Mohandas Ghandi, and other men who liberated their people, and who are considered by historians "Men of Universal Destiny," receive a Nobel? Of course not. Did Henry Kissinger receive a Nobel for the U.S. war and defeat in Vietnam? Sure he did. And to make Kissinger's award look real, the Nobel Committee offered the North Vietnamese foreign minister Le Duc Tho a Nobel too! He refused the offer. "There was never a peace deal with the U.S. We won the war," he said. Did the Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko get a Nobel peace for the Soviet war and defeat in Afghanistan? Of course not. The Nobels are for the U.S.
politicians, and the enemies or dissidents of the U.S. enemies.

Do the Norwegians really care about dissidents languishing in prisons?
How many thousands anti-American Afghans are languishing in prisons in Afghanistan since 2001 without trial? The U.S. doesn't say, but a figure of 50.000 is talked about.. Would anyone of them get a Nobel? No. Barack Obama took the Nobel Peace Prize for keeping them in prison far worse than the Chinese prisons without trial. Is the life of Liu Xiaobo, who at least had a trial, worth a Nobel Peace Prize, while the lives of thousands of U.S. prisoners -and also the thousands of Palestinian prisoners kept for life without trial by Israel, worth anything? No, it is not! And that is the shame of the Nobel Peace Prize. And I feel those with high ethical standards - like Le Duc Tho- should refuse to accept it. Nikos Retsos, retired professor

Oct. 08 2010 05:54 PM

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