Peace Corp Promise of Global Volunteers

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

Fifty years ago this month, then-Senator John F. Kennedy delivered a rousing speech asking the nation to take part in the global community. Kennedy's call for the nation’s young to volunteer their time and efforts would soon become the Peace Corps.

Half a century later, has Kennedy’s legacy of volunteerism faded? We discuss the Peace Corps' success and relevance in the 21st century with two people who have first hand experience, both then and now. Elyse Peterson served two tours as a Peace Corps volunteer. Her latest was a five month project in Antigua. We also speak to Kevin Lowther. Kevin volunteered in Sierra Leone in 1963 and is the retired regional director of Southern Africa for Africare.

Guests:

Kevin Lowther and Elyse Petersen

Comments [1]

Katia

After college, when I was having trouble finding a job, I thought of joining the Peace Corps. Ultimately practicality set in and I did not; I realized that with student loans looming over my head and no job prospects, the last thing I needed to do was go away and come back two years older, but without gaining any practical job skills (being a nice person only gets you so far, and in the end employers want somebody with experience in what they're hiring for, not saving the world), so still with no job prospects and bills to pay. Part of me wishes I'd had that experience, but another part of me also knows that knuckling down and doing the "grown-up thing" was probably the best thing to do. (And in hindsight, I am very glad, as I would've been getting out of the Peace Corps in late 2008 or early-to-mid 2009, when job possibilities would've been even more slim)

Oct. 06 2010 06:12 PM

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