Latino Registered Voters Less Likely to Vote This Year, Poll Finds

Pew Hispanic Center finds 'Weak Voter Motivation'

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

With less than a month until Election Day, Democrats are hoping to keep control of both the House and Senate while trying to appeal to their core constituencies. Just two years ago, President Obama brought the Democrats back to the White House with the help of Latino voters. Democrats will surely need those votes if they hope to keep their majorities in Congress, but it is not clear that the Latino votes will come through in the mid-terms.  A new poll from the Pew Hispanic Center reports that only 51 percent of Latino registered voters say they are "absolutely certain to vote," this season, compared to 70 percent of all registered voters who say they'll go to the polls.

Why is it looking like so many Latinos will skip voting November 2?

Marc Lacey, Phoenix bureau chief for The New York Times, sees the Arizona immigration law as being a big reason for many Latinos' low voter motivation this season.

Univision host Jorge Ramos sees Latinos frustrated by both Democrats and Republicans, and instead of going out to vote, are voting by staying home.

Guests:

Marc Lacey and Jorge Ramos

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [1]

David Holzman from Lexington MA

To hear Jorge Ramos tell it, the primary issue for Americans of Latino extraction is amnesty, and they are all for it. Unfortunately, the mainstream media mostly buys this non-analysis. And in fact, it's false. A Zogby poll found that Americans of Latino extraction oppose amnesty by a whopping 52 to 34 percent.

If I were in the relevant demographic, I'd be insulted. As a Jew, Israel is low on my list of concerns when I vote.

Oct. 06 2010 11:58 AM

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