The food of Rosh Hashana, re-imagined

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Year in and year out families gather to commemorate holidays and special events with iconic foods: at the Lunar New Year, dumplings; at Thanksgiving, turkey; and Rosh Hashana brings brisket. Celebratory foods connect us to our culture. Can we re-imagine these foods for modern palates without upsetting family members and vital cultural traditions? The answer is yes, and deliciously. Out with the brisket and in with the osso buco when Melissa Clark re-imagines the food of Rosh Hashana.

Guests: Melissa Clark, New York Times food writer, and Patrik Henry Bass, Takeaway contributor and ESSENCE magazine senior editor

Melissa Clark's apple-walnut cake for Rosh Hashanah. Adam Hirsch
Adam Hirsch
Melissa Clark's Honey Apple cake for Rosh Hashana.



New Year Honey Apple Cake

Makes 1 Bundt cake to serve 6 to 8

3 cups diced apples (about 2 apples)
1 cup chopped walnuts, lightly toasted
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 3/4 cups sugar
1 1/4 cups vegetable oil
3 eggs
2 tablespoons dark honey, preferably chestnut, plus additional for glazing

1. Preheat the oven to 325 °F. Lightly grease a Bundt pan or tube pan.
2. In a bowl, mix together the apples, walnuts, vanilla, and cinnamon. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, and salt.
3. Using an electric mixer, beat the sugar, oil, eggs, and honey together in a large bowl. Add the dry ingredients and beat until completely combined. Fold in the apple mixture.
4. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and bake for an hour and a half, or until a tester inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean.
5. Turn the cake out onto a plate and glaze with the additional honey.

Contributors:

Melissa Locker

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