Frustrated With Politicians, Impatient Voters Mount Recall Campaigns

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Many voters, frustrated with their current elected officials, have decided to take action well ahead of election day. In cities and towns across America, constituents are calling for recall elections—efforts to oust their elected officials from office in the middle of their terms.

Daniel Varela was one of those officials. He was elected Mayor of Livingston, California, but was ousted just a month ago. We also talk with Michael Cooper, a reporter for our partner The New York Times, who has been covering similar recalls all across the country.

Guests:

Michael Cooper and Daniel Varela

Produced by:

Posey Gruener

Comments [1]

Gebre Kedan from Canada

In 1787, 55 suits gathered in Philly to revise the Articles of Confederation of the then existing 13 colonies. They represented an economic elite of about 100,000, in a population of about 3,000,000. NOT A SINGLE GRASS-ROOT REP WAS THERE!!! They immediately sequestered themselves behind closed doors, and established what we know today as the American system of government. They agreed that the Government should not only protect big business, but promote it. This defines a plutocracy. Heartiest congratulations to the people of Livingston and like-minded citizens, for putting into motion a political tsunami that'll soon engulf the world (and against which NO government will be able to stand), and make government of the people, by the people, for the people, a living reality. The exit sign looms LARGE before the plutocrats. And thus will it be!!!

Oct. 05 2010 09:31 AM

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