C Street: Sex Scandals, Fundamentalism, Family

Monday, September 27, 2010

133 C Street Southeast is a nondescript red-brick building in Washington DC. Behind the bricks, however, the building registered as a church and affiliated with a secretive Christian group known as “The Family.”

C Street friends and “Family” have included Strom Thurmond, Pat Robertson's father (Absalom Willis Robertson), John Ashcroft, and some of the biggest names in government.

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford shares ties with C Street. In fact, he disclosed the truth about his extra-marital affair with his friends there before the affair went public.

But Sanford’s isn’t the only sex scandal linked to C Street. And sex scandals are, in fact, only one of many questionable things linked to the brick structure on Capitol Hill.

Jeff Sharlet has been researching C Street for years. He’s been inside C Street. He’s the author of a new book about the happenings inside the building called “C Street: The Fundamentalist Threat to American Democracy.” And he shares his knowledge with us today.

Comments [1]

Charles

Personally, I'm a lot more concerned with the house that Dick Durbin and Chuck Schumer share in Washington, than I am with this group.

But I'm a realist. I don't like Jeff Sharlet's politics any more than he likes my politics. He's not changing my mind, and I'm not changing his mind.

That just leaves us with John Hockenberry, in his role as journalist. And Hockenberry led off this story asking the question, essentially, is the C Street house a kind of fundamentalist Christian madrass, or is it it a front to subvert the Constitution? That was the choice, as I listened to Hockenberry in the opening sentences. Nice to know that Hockenberry is offering his audience intelligent choices. It reminds me of that other leading light in current political debates, Stephen Colbert, asking a hypothetical question whether C Street is a great organization, or the greatest organization? With this story, Hockenberry might have reached a level of seriousness on a par with Mr. Colbert.

Sep. 27 2010 12:25 PM

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