Is America Reaching its Millennium Development Goals?

Ambitious goal to end world poverty by 2015 gets even closer

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Spanish President José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero addresses the Millennium Development Goals Summit at the United Nations headquarters in New York, September 20, 2010. (EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images/Getty)

One of the major items on the United Nations' agenda this week is the Millennium Development Goals — an eight-pronged initiative laid out in 2001 by nearly 200 U.N. member states to help end extreme poverty around the world by 2015. Today, Secretery General Ban Ki-moon has called a meeting to evaluate the initiative, and 150 national leaders are expected to attend. Many of the leaders will likely acknowledge what may seem obvious: some progress is certainly evident, but much more remains to be done. What is the role the United States is playing — or failing to play — in this global quest?

Michael Klosson is a former Ambassador to Cyprus and the current Vice President of Policy and Humanitarian Response for Save the Children, which is working to improve the living standard of children around the world. He joins us to look closer at the Millennium Development Goals and how or whether they're being reached.

Guests:

Michael Klosson

Comments [1]

fatima from India

Parenting is the most important skill that has to be stressed. imparted and nurtured in the right way, so that all children once brought up in secure grounds, at least to a large extent, the future of the world may tend to turn out be favourable.

Sep. 22 2010 04:29 AM

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