Suspected Seattle Cop Killer Shot Dead

Tuesday, December 01, 2009

The Seattle Police department is reporting that they have shot and killed Maurice Clemmons, the man accused of killing four police officers over the weekend. Past convictions for robberies, burglaries and thefts plaster his rap sheet. We speak to KUOW reporter Patricia Murphy, who has been following this story out in Seattle, and New York Times reporter Kate Zernike, who is writing the story for today's Times.

 

Listen to our earlier interview with KUOW reporter Liz Jones:

Guests:

Patricia Murphy and Kate Zernike

Contributors:

David J Fazekas and Hsi-Chang Lin

Comments [9]

Charles

I'll happily accept the correction on the amount of the bond, if true; but what about the rest of this story? Is it not obvious, that if Mike Huckabee has some culpability for what he did eight years ago as Governor (and dealing with a criminal charge dating from when the defendant was 16), then what of the two state judges who dealt with the same defendant much more recently, on charges that included the assault of a police officer? I'm not trying to absolve Huckabee (the conservative press is not giving Huckabee much support or wiggle room on this); but is it not at least relevant to discuss the much more recent recidivist arrests, in Washington state? That's my point; it's about balanced and complete reporting, not whether Huckabee's eight year old commutation can be defended.

Dec. 01 2009 01:29 PM
Tone

Sorry for the triple post. The site didn't give me any feedback when I clicked Submit, so I clicked it again.

Dec. 01 2009 01:10 PM
Tone

Actually, you're wrong, Charles, and so was O'Reilly.

The bail was set at $150,000 (TEN TIMES what O'Reilly reported). $15,000 was what Clemmons paid to a bail bondsman, who in turn put up the full amount to secure his release.

So blame O'Reilly's precious free market system, which allows bail bond businesses like this to exist and to get criminals out of jail for far less bail than the judges have set.

You can argue that $150,000 is still too low, but don't using the $15,000 figure and trying to pin it on lenient judges is just flat-out wrong. O'Reilly surely knew this was wrong, and was just trying to enflame people like you and deflect blame from Huckabee onto the judges.

Dec. 01 2009 01:09 PM
Tone

Actually, you're wrong, Charles, and so was O'Reilly.

The bail was set at $150,000 (TEN TIMES what O'Reilly reported). $15,000 was what Clemmons paid to a bail bondsman, who in turn put up the full amount to secure his release.

So blame O'Reilly's precious free market system, which allows bail bond businesses like this to exist and to get criminals out of jail for far less bail than the judges have set.

You can argue that $150,000 is still too low, but don't using the $15,000 figure and trying to pin it on lenient judges is just flat-out wrong. O'Reilly surely knew this was wrong, and was just trying to enflame people like you and deflect blame from Huckabee onto the judges.

Dec. 01 2009 01:09 PM
Tone

Actually, you're wrong, Charles, and so was O'Reilly.

The bail was set at $150,000 (TEN TIMES what O'Reilly reported). $15,000 was what Clemmons paid to a bail bondsman, who in turn put up the full amount to secure his release.

So blame O'Reilly's precious free market system, which allows bail bond businesses like this to exist and to get criminals out of jail for far less bail than the judges have set.

You can argue that $150,000 is still too low, but don't using the $15,000 figure and trying to pin it on lenient judges is just flat-out wrong. O'Reilly surely knew this was wrong, and was just trying to enflame people like you and deflect blame from Huckabee onto the judges.

Dec. 01 2009 01:09 PM
Dan Thomas

You're funny. A friend of my family is on the o'reilly comedy show as an expert lawyer. Her mom hates the FOX opportunists. My family is in the news biz. FOX is not news. And O'Reilly is a nut job.

Dec. 01 2009 11:29 AM
Dan Thomas

You're funny. A friend of my family is on the o'reilly comedy show as an expert lawyer. Her mom hates the FOX opportunists. My family is in the news biz. FOX is not news. And O'Reilly is a nut job.

Dec. 01 2009 11:29 AM
Charles

The unconcealed agenda in this story was stated clearly by Ms. Headlee:

"He [Maurice Clemons] was out because he was granted clemency by Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee."

The Takeaway should ask itself; is that a true, accurate, complete, and genuinely informative statement on the case? Or is it a "Takeaway," a quick sound bite; a tidbit of possibly-misleading news, designed for people who don't have the time to examine issues and therefore need to be told what to think.

You know, the kind of people that NPR news says it does not want to cater to; products of the kind of news reporting that NPR says that it doesn't do.

Dec. 01 2009 10:29 AM
Charles

In fact, watchers of The O'Reilly Factor on Fox News last night would have been better informed about the story than NPR listeners. They would have heard more of the hard and important questions that Bill O'Reilly put to his colleague Mike Huckabee.

At the same time, O'Reilly pointed out, accurately, that while Clemons was indeed granted clemency by Gov. Huckabee eight years ago (for a crime committed by Clemons when he was 16), two different state court judges in Washington had just recently allowed Clemons out on a mere $15,000 bail bond, when he had been accused of assault on a police officer and the rape of a 12 year-old.

The Takeaway never even mentioned the two Washington state judges. I wonder if Celeste Headlee even knew that part of the story. It seems pretty relevant, unless of course your only goal is to try to trash a high-profile conservative personality like Mike Huckabee. Perhaps Celeste ought to watch Fox news more often; she might learn something.

Dec. 01 2009 10:25 AM

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