States that face growing number of unemployment rates

Thursday, March 12, 2009

A growing number of states are suffering double-digit unemployment rates, fueling fears that the national jobless rate could hit 10 percent by the end of the year. In January, jobless rates rose in almost every state and the District of Columbia. Two of the states that received the highest rates of unemployment were Oregon and South Carolina.

Joining The Takeaway to discuss their concerns are Ethan Lindsey, reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting, and Noelle Phillips, an economics and business reporter for The State newspaper in Columbia, South Carolina.

"A lot of industries were hanging on to see if things were going to turn around, and when it didn't look like that was going to happen, the axe fell."
— Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter Ethan Lindsey on the drastic rise in unemployment in Oregon

Guests:

Ethan Lindsey and Noelle Phillips

Hosted by:

Farai Chideya

Comments [2]

Jeremiah

Is an "unemployment rate" the same as a "jobless rate?"

Mar. 15 2009 12:56 PM
Waffles Pi Natusch

Rhode Island’s unemployment rate has jumped to 10.3%, the worst it’s been since the ‘70’s. 20,000 jobs were lost this year alone. The state hired 17 call center employees to handle the backlog of unemployment claims, while residents (without financial assistance)wait for the state to catch up. They need to find employment fast. I've been in the career management business for 15 years, and in this economy job hunters are seeking advice on how to cope, then how to succeed in a failing local economy. One thing everyone should remember is that you can’t expect to be able to do it alone.

For anyone seeking employment: develop an action plan, solicit the help of friends (both business and personal), get back in “the loop, “market themselves (LinkedIn, new resume, appearance) “network to get work”, and rebuild self-confidence to stand out from the crowd of job seekers.

Mar. 13 2009 03:56 PM

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