Black Farmers' Settlement Withheld ... Again

Monday, August 09, 2010

It's been 11 years and the nation's black farmers have still not received the nearly $1.25 billion settlement they were promised by the Agriculture Department. The Senate was expected to approve the measure before the start of recess last Thursday, but Republicans put the brakes on the vote after citing concerns that Democrats had not outlined a plan to pay for the settlement.

According to the National Black Farmers Association, it was the seventh attempt by the Senate to approve the funds in recent weeks. The settlement dates back to a case started in 1997 in which a federal judge ruled that qualified farmers could each receive $50,000 to settle claims of racial bias. Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich has been following this story.

Guests:

Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

Arwa Gunja

Comments [2]

KEN from TX

SO WHAT IS THE NEXT LEGAL ACTION FOR THE BLACK FARMERS AFTER THIS LATEST SENATE STALLMENT

Aug. 13 2010 12:25 PM
william j. simmons

as everyone is aware, black people built this country from the ground up (i really am seriously when i say from the ground up). from slaveship to our present day of so call freedom, we have only the sky to show for what our ancestors had slaved for. sad to say the process of paying every other race without all the hitches that are hung to this settlement of overdue justice. i am begining to believe it is just us. (not justice), i pray to God that one day we as a nation of people can come to a reality point and make available to all what is due, and also realize when we do get it right and understand that there is enough wealth in the united states to give every citizen $125,000.00 anually and not change the wealth status of our country. may God bless all of us. and let every man realize we need each other to make America what it needs to be. thank you".

Aug. 12 2010 10:53 PM

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