Fears of Deflation Amidst Falling Prices

Friday, August 06, 2010

On the face of it, prices going down seems like it could be a good thing. However, as economists await Friday's monthly jobs report, they're worried about the dreaded deflation. To help get a sense from our listeners, we're looking for your personal jobs report: Do you feel secure in your job, if you have one? If you're still looking, has it gotten any harder? Easier? Let us know in the comments section below.

“Deflation poses a risk to folks on Main Street because employers are going to be less inclined to hire workers. Right now job creation is the issue on everybody’s mind — from Main Street to Wall Street to the White House,” says economist William Rodgers.

The prospect of a deflationary future is based on real data — the consumer price index fell for the last three months from April to June – according to the latest Labor Department statistics.

William Rodgers, professor and chief economist of the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University, explains just how concerned we should be about this trend.

Guests:

William Rodgers

Produced by:

Karin Kamp

Comments [2]

Peg

For me, job security means self employment. At 60, landing A JOB has been unsuccessful, but I WORK (anything I can find). As a self employed individual, I pay higher taxes and have no benefits. I have a feeling that more and more former JOB HOLDERS will be joining me. I think it's time to address the tax and benefit inequalities between an employee and a self employed worker.

Aug. 06 2010 08:26 AM

Taking politics out of the equation, how would one write the citizenship law (amendment) today. I do not believe that anyone would logically write that simply being born on US soil constitutes citizenship.

Aug. 05 2010 11:33 AM

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