Pete Carroll: Can He 'Win Forever'?

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Former USC football coach Pete Carroll has at times been likened to a god in California for his wildly successful nine year run. But during his time in Los Angeles, questions arose over whether his team was playing a fair game. This summer, the NCAA levied sanctions against the school, charging Reggie Bush — now a running back with the New Orleans Saints — received gifts from an agent during his time playing for USC.

This week, the school said it will return the Heisman trophy that Bush won in 2005. Carroll effectively left USC to deal with the fallout from the Reggie Bush controversy when he took over the head coaching job at the Seattle Seahawks last January. Meanwhile, bloggers, sports fans and journalists are all asking: How could Carroll NOT have known about Bush's rules violations? And what does that mean about who's responsible? Carroll has written a new book called "Win Forever: Live, Work, and Play like a Champion." He tells us about his legacy and the fairness of college athletics.

Guests:

Pete Carroll

Produced by:

Mary Harris

Comments [1]

Mitch Dinnerstein from New York City

why did you give Pate Carroll such an easy time. what a hypodrite. He makes over $4 milliion dollars exploiting players like Reggie Bush and he has the nerve to throw Bush under the bus for getting a few crumbs for himself. Is USC retuning all the money that Reggie brought to the program for winning titles? Is Pete Carroll returning his ludicrous salary? By the way how many of these athletes are graduating from USC? What happens to the ones who don't make it to the NFL? What utter hypocrisy.

Jul. 22 2010 10:04 AM

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