Are Some Kids Just Born to Be Bad?

Monday, July 19, 2010

sad child reflection (D. Sharon Pruitt)

Last week, Dr. Richard Friedman wrote an article for The New York Times called “Accepting That Good Parents May Plant Bad Seeds.” It suggested that good parents who have bad kids sometimes just can’t help it.

In other words: Just as some kids are wired to be smarter or shorter, some are wired to be meaner and naughtier, regardless of how good or bad their parents are.

 

Over 400 people have left comments for Dr. Friedman on The New York Times website thus far, including Brad Morrison, a Unix engineer in Houston who, as a child, was labeled a “bad seed.” Dr. Friedman and Brad Morrison talk with us about their opinions and experiences with the "bad seed" label.

 

Guests:

Dr. Richard Friedman and Brad Morrison

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer

Comments [4]

daryl from australia

Hi.

Dr Friedman is 100 per cent wright.
Good familys can have bad kids.
Some kids are just bad. And will
Not change. They ruin there parents
lifes.

Jul. 27 2010 04:23 AM
Maryam from Iran

Hi,

I have a question. What do you think about the children who born in bad families and when they grow up they also get bad. I mean a bad family can effect a lot on the personality of a child. I'm not talking about the exeptions I'm just asking you why it happens? and finally why some of us born in good families and some of us in bad ones?

Jul. 20 2010 07:48 AM
carol stewart from 10463

Dr. Friedman is aware that his tittle "bad seed," is a grabber, getting him attention, and since children do not vote or have a lobby I wish Public Radio would not encourage this type study given so many varibles: economic, cultural, parents, etc., to reach any conclusion. Children need good attention and ones true interests.

Jul. 19 2010 09:07 AM
Camille

I agree with Brad. I was (and probably still am) a bit of a "bad seed". I think sometimes it has to do with being highly intelligent and not having enough challenges and/or having nowhere to put that creative energy. You know what they say about "idle hands...". I was tracked into high achiever courses in elementary school and that quelled some of it,but later on when those classes were no longer available, I suffered from never feeling challenged enough and sort of have been trapped in a cycle of withdrawing and lashing out. I graduated from high school at 16 and a very good university at 20, but I think I am still searching for my place and my peace. But it's sorta comforting to know that there's a kernel of it that maybe I have no control over.

Jul. 19 2010 09:01 AM

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