An Argument Against Gravity

Dutch physicist asserts gravity is a by-product of other physical laws

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Although gravity has remained an accepted theory and (relatively) free from controversy for centuries, one scientist is rocking the boat when it comes to one of our most basic laws of physics.

Theoretical physicist and professor at the University of Amsterdam, Erik Verlinde, recently wrote a paper entitled "On the Origins of Gravity and the Laws of Newton."  In it, Verlinde argues that gravity is merely an illusion. Not surprisingly, this theory has been met with mixed reactions from his fellow scientists.

Guests:

Erik Verlinde

Produced by:

Amanda Moore

Comments [3]

Nanmaaran N from India


Non existance of Gravity was illustrated by Indian Philosopher ' vethathri Maharishi ' many decades ago. He has also illustrated the origin of Gravity.

Jul. 26 2010 04:12 AM
david from windsor

That is a possibility and sure Newton and his supporetrs will be shaken. Newton may be also shaken of the grave. But newton being was alive and is dead now is also an illusion.

Jul. 16 2010 03:28 AM
Mark Collins from Austin, TX

Ludwig Boltzmann described Entropy in terms of the number of distinct microscopic states that the particles composing a macroscopic "chunk" of matter could be in while still looking like the same macroscopic "chunk". As an example, for the air in a room, its thermodynamic entropy would equal the logarithm of the count of all the ways that the individual gas molecules could be distributed in the room, and all the ways they could be moving. If gravity is a function of entropy, then entropy should have a "critical mass" where it starts creating gravatic effects.

Jul. 14 2010 10:38 PM

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