First Take: Radicalism in East Africa, AIDS and Black Churches, Goodbye to Harvey Pekar

Monday, July 12, 2010 - 01:06 PM

Survivors are seen at an Ethiopian-owned restaurant in the Kabalagala area of Kampala late on Sunday,  moments after twin bomb blasts tore through crowds of football fans watching the World Cup final Survivors are seen at an Ethiopian-owned restaurant in the Kabalagala area of Kampala late on Sunday, moments after twin bomb blasts tore through crowds of football fans watching the World Cup final (Getty Images)

UPDATED 9:00 p.m EST

Alex Goldmark here on the night shift with a quick update. Tomorrow morning the Obama administration will be announcing their strategy for combating HIV/AIDS. We will be getting the details straight from the source, Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius.  

That's pretty much the only update right now. 

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

The World Cup ended with Spain's triumph in South Africa and tragedy in Uganda. We are continuing to follow the developments after thecoordinated bombing attacks in Kampala. Somalia's al-Shabab militia has claimed responsibility. For our conversation tomorrow, we're looking at what geography and the regional links can teach us about radicalism's reach in Somalia, Kenya, and Uganda.

In advance of President Obama's announcement tomorrow about a new strategy to contain the rate of HIV infections, we are making calls to community leaders and churches about how they are changing their approach to AIDS education. There are interesting shifts happening in black churches to respond to the growing number of HIV cases among African Americans. Some churches are including AIDS prevention messages in sermons, offering testing on-site, and starting uncomfortable conversations about risky behaviors.

Finally, we were sad to hear about the passing of comic author Harvey Pekar early this morning. Most know him as the genius everyman behind "American Splendor," but here at The Takeaway, we remember him fondly as one of our first guests. John Hockenberry and our digital editor Jim Colgan interviewed him during our piloting phrase. We asked him to explain why his home state of Ohio always managed to make itself the linchpin in American political contests. His answer: "Most people in Ohio are just like the are in the rest of the country — average." Thank goodness we have this illustration to remember it by.

Tags:

More in:

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.