Denver's Design for the Future: The "New Suburbia"

Urban planners and architects redesign the Denver metro area

Friday, June 12, 2009

In Denver, Colorado, a group of urban planners and architects gather this week to debate urban design. How can suburbia and downtown get closer? Joining The Takeaway from Denver is Ellen Dunham, the Director of the Architecture program at Georgia Institute of Technology and the co-author of "Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs".

Guests:

Ellen Dunham-Jones

Hosted by:

Farai Chideya

Contributors:

Jen Poyant

Comments [2]

infra

How should cities and suburbs be designed for the twenty-first century? What are your thoughts about new urbanism, and how it will affect the community where you live? Join the lively debate today at www.infrastructureusa.org, and share your view of the future of American cities.

Jun. 15 2009 01:17 PM
Rosie

I find suburban life to be an extremely "mind-numbing" and isolating experience. Lack of decent public transportation within the suburb and to other towns and cities, lack of diversity, lack of places where I could walk instead of having to get in the car, and lack of cultural activities have made my suburban life extremely boring and unchallenging.

And it seems to me that such isolation and lack of intellectual challenge have caused most people in their suburbs to focus on such trivial things. Just watch or attend a suburban council meeting. It seems that suburban life makes people lose touch with other aspects of life and the rest of world while making their houses and their "property values" as well as "fitting in" the main focus of their lives. As the introduction of a cable series puts it brilliantly: "Ticky, tacky little boxes. They all look the same. They all act the same".

Jun. 12 2009 09:17 AM

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