Music to invest by

Wednesday, January 07, 2009

Crank up the tunes--they might help you make money on Wall Street. Phil Maymin, a professor at the Polytechnic Institute of NYU, studied decades of Billboard Hot 100 hits and discovered that songs with more consistent beats tend to be popular just before periods of high volatility in the stock market. He'll explain his theory and tell us what he thinks the current hit, "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" by Beyonce, says about our financial future.

For more about how this theory works, watch Phil Maymin's video on Youtube.

Guests:

Phil Maymin

Contributors:

Melissa Locker and Nadia Zonis

Comments [6]

ambrose

I agree with mlocker. Careful critical thinking involves the abiltity to distinguish between causality and proximity. If I stand at a street corner and say "Light, turn green, so I can cross," and the light turns green, I have not caused the light to turn green. The Bob Marley song that perks me up is the one with the lyric (approximately -- I am a pre-baby boomer with a pre-baby boomer's memory), "Dance to the Music, Dance. Forget your worries and dance. Forget your sickness and dance. Forget your weakness and dance." It sings to me, but I don't think it has anything to do with the economy.this is required to evwry human being

Jul. 02 2010 03:16 AM
Thinker

I agree with mlocker. Careful critical thinking involves the abiltity to distinguish between causality and proximity. If I stand at a street corner and say "Light, turn green, so I can cross," and the light turns green, I have not caused the light to turn green. The Bob Marley song that perks me up is the one with the lyric (approximately -- I am a pre-baby boomer with a pre-baby boomer's memory), "Dance to the Music, Dance. Forget your worries and dance. Forget your sickness and dance. Forget your weakness and dance." It sings to me, but I don't think it has anything to do with the economy.

Jan. 16 2009 02:09 PM
mlocker

I am listening to your show this depressing and sleety drizzly morning over WCAI in Truro.
Professor Mayman's hypothesis is just another example of the fallacy known as "Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc," or after this, therefore because of this. The high priest in a primitive tribe takes advantage of this by putting on a green robe, and Spring comes.
I guarantee you that the only connection between adults and the Billboard Hot 100 is telling the kids in the back seat to turn that damn noise off. Nobody I know can even name the most popular artists of today, let alone their songs. Beyonce who?

My own perk up song is by Bob Marley, "Don't worry, 'bout a thing, 'cause every little thing's gonna be all right...." and there is no steadier beat than the
Marley Reggae shuffle.
submitted to The Takeaway by Gaylord A. Wood, Jr.
Fort Lauderdale

Jan. 07 2009 09:58 AM
bill brennan

Favorite song for when times are down? Tubthumper by Chumbawamba:

"I get knocked down, but I get up again, ain't nobody gonna keep me down!"

Great tune.

Jan. 07 2009 09:37 AM
SUSAN LUSK

The disco-era version of Irving Berlin's 1929 "Puttin' On The Ritz" (1982, Taco) is a fabulous toe-tapper. And -- according to Maymin's theory -- since the beat is so varied, it ought to get the economy jumping again.

Jan. 07 2009 09:15 AM
wendy evans

Even though I'm a boomer from the rock era, I've got to say that for sheer optimism the best song I can think of is Les Brown's "Bizet Has His Day"- It makes you feel better about everything. If it's just money on your mind, try Combustible Edison's "The Millionaire's Holiday"

Jan. 07 2009 07:52 AM

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