Manny Ramirez Ruined My Fantasy!

Fans and fantasy-baseball owners loved Manny and wanted to believe in him

Friday, May 08, 2009

Los Angeles Dodgers slugger Manny Ramirez shocked the sporting world yesterday when it was reported that he tested positive for a banned performance-enhancing substance. The result? Immediate suspension for 50 games. Dodgers fans aren't the only ones who are crushed. So are the thousands of members of baseball fantasy leagues. The Dodgers slugger was owned in 100% of fantasy leagues hosted on CBS Sports Web site, and 99% of the leagues hosted on Yahoo (where no player has a 100% ownership number). What's a fantasy leaguer to do? The Takeaway talks to Nando Di Fino, Sports Reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

For more, read Nando Di Fino's Wall Street Journal article How Fantasy Teams Can Cope Without Manny.

Guests:

Nando Di Fino

Hosted by:

Farai Chideya

Contributors:

Sitara Nieves

Comments [1]

ibrahim abdul-matin

Steroid use is like actors getting plastic surgery. its part of the pressure, money, performance, and the American obsession with youth and never getting weak. Manny Ramirez is the just the latest thrown under the bus of an image-obsessed culture.

First of all baseball isn't track or football when you're trying to push the limits of human performance, Baseball players aren't pushing the limits in general and looking towards roids for an edge, they're doing it out of laziness. Everything they want to achieve is possible with diet and the right fitness regimen.

I have little sadness for the loss of Manny who is going to come back fresh, 8 million dollars lighter, and leave his team to the playoffs and maybe even to a World Series. He will still make more money than most people i know will ever see in their entire lifetime!

May. 08 2009 12:29 PM

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