Heartwarming news: A coat designed for the homeless is insulated with newspaper

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

For those living on the streets, newspapers could prove to be an unlikely lifeline this winter. Taxi, a Toronto-based advertising agency, is donating thousands of its high-tech, sub-zero coats to the homeless. The jacket, when filled with an assortment of op-eds, sports, movie listings and classified pages, is as protective as any down-filled coat. For a look at this news many can use, The Takeaway turns to Taxi's Steve Mykolyn, the creative force behind the winter gear.
"We talked to different social agencies about what was something that homeless people could use: it was socks, hat, a coat."
— Steve Mykolyn on a cold weather coat for the homeless

Guests:

Steve Mykolyn

Comments [6]

Bizzylizzy

I have to disagree with your comments. I work with the homeless and when given the chace to pick out what jacket or coat, hat, scarves they would like (all donated) they ARE concerned with how they look. And, they are concerned that no one should know they are homeless - when we di intake to gather stats for our funders, many of them are reluctant to be classified as homeless. Because I am the medical person and attend to their health, they are more forthcoming with me.
I think JH had a good point - it does matter to them not to be the object of ridicule.

Dec. 24 2008 04:56 PM
J Moore

Paraphrasing: "As the designer, shouldn't he first ask old Aqualung if he'll feel stigmatized when he gives up his cardboard box and tattered parka for a newspaper coat with 15 pockets?" (People may talk.) I must agree with some others here regarding questions by JH, but hey folks, he's just another liberal on NPR. What harm can he really do? Think of the liberal majorities in the House of Representatives, in the Senate, and the wealth re-distributor in White House... and be afraid.

Dec. 24 2008 02:22 AM
polar

These jackets are an amazing idea, kudos to Steve and Taxi for "actually" giving a damn about people and giving back to society in a helpful and positive manner. I have an idea for anyone with some nice worn woolly socks, send them to the station for John's mouth.

Dec. 23 2008 12:59 PM
Ziggy

What a cool idea. Solutions to big pervasive problems such as homelessness, hunger and joblessness are only really going to be resolved with the combined attention of government and creative initiative from companies and individuals.

Well done, TAXI.

Dec. 23 2008 12:26 PM
matty

erickson zeroed right in on why i am here.

this is a perfect example of why i loathe this show. my gf turns on the shower radio in the morning set to npr so i have no choice but to wake up to this drivel but i feel like i lose brain cells with every inane comment one of you morons make.

that is the kind of question a painfully self righteous, socially engaged sophomore would ask - "uh, that's great that you make a coat that homeless people can stay warm in -40 weather with, but isn't it wrong to stigmatize them?" have you ever been caught in -40 weather? not looking homeless would be the last thing on your mind. and the tone in your voice when you posed that question.

you are the kind of idiot that gives liberals a bad name.

ugh.

Dec. 23 2008 10:05 AM
erickson

Wow John once again you focus like a laser on the least important part of the story. "as a designer shouldn't you be concerned with wether or not the homeless people feel like they are being identified as homeless?" Please take a class in empathy and consider that anyone trying to survive on the street would rather be warm than fashionable. Not to mention if you're huddled on a steam grate at -10 people already have a pretty good idea you don't have a home. Sometimes I can't believe how utterly self involved and ego centric you are. The coat is a life saver.

Dec. 23 2008 09:46 AM

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