Fifteen years after the genocide, Rwanda re-brands itself

Monday, April 06, 2009

This week marks the start of the 15th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide in which an estimated 800,000 ethnic Rwandan Tutsis were killed by ethnic Rwandan Hutus. The genocide destroyed Rwanda’s economy and infrastructure. Today, the Rwandan capital of Kigali is a place of cafes with wi-fi and gourmet coffee even a shopping mall. The Takeaway talks to Jeff Chu, Senior Editor at Fast Company magazine. His story Rwanda Rising, in this month’s issue explores Rwanda President Paul Kagame's aggressive attempts to bust traditional aid models, court western investors, and to turn Rwanda from an impoverished nation into a powerful, popular brand.

After you read his article, be sure to read Jeff Chu's interview with Rwanda's President in Fast Company.

Guests:

Jeff Chu

Contributors:

Noel King

Comments [1]

Judi Farer

Jeff Chu's observations are so accurate. This Takeaway segment was so very refreshing. I work with a small group Rwanda Knits which has helped over 1000 women develop economic empowerment. The success of this project is due to the determination and resourcefulness of rural women who may never be featured in the American media (and should) but who are climbing out of poverty slowly. Their story is fascinating. Take a look at our web site and consider doing a segment about " Rwanda: the other 98%." with Cari Clement (who has just returned from Rwanda) or, better, with Laura Hanson, our cooperative development specialist, who is living there. Laura, in particular, has great insight about these amazing women and the culture that is making Rwanda "the little country that can."

Apr. 06 2009 10:19 AM

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