Can the Globe stay afloat?

Tuesday, May 05, 2009

The future of the Boston Globe is in peril, as the paper's owner, The New York Times Company, and the unions continue to negotiate. The company is looking for $20 million of cost cuts in order to save the 137-year-old broadsheet. The Globe—one of the biggest names in journalism—is the highest selling paper in New England and the 14th largest in the nation. But its owner has threatened to close up shop if The Globe can't stem losses expected to reach $85 million this year. Joining us to discuss the paper’s fate is Emily Rooney. She is the host of the news show Greater Boston, she also the also hosts the weekly media criticism show, Beat the Press. For a sense of what the city and its readers will lose we are also joined by two devoted Boston Globe readers: David E. Williams of Brookline in Boston and Catherine Bumpus of Woods Hole, Mass.

Guests:

Catherine Bumpus, Chelsea Merz, Emily Rooney and David E. WIlliams

Hosted by:

Farai Chideya

Comments [1]

Marco

What? No comments? It is kind of fitting given the general apathy I see regarding the death of newsprint. It is not so much that reading online is either more or less convenient than paper. It is that it's faster. Print is a day old. At 43, I still tend to like print, but go online for current news. My children will have no such nostalgic preference. I could go on, but the folks at TechCrunch have a better take on it than I do, in an article about the newspaper sized Kindle discussed on your show: http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/05/04/the-big-screen-kindle-hail-mary-to-newspapers-will-fall-incomplete/

I will mourn newsprint but so far its demise looks inevitable.

May. 05 2009 02:48 PM

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