As Arizona Struggles to Defend Harsh Immigration Law, Similar Legislation Spreads to Four States

Thursday, June 03, 2010

Opponents of Arizona's new immigration law listen during a protest outside the state capitol building on April 25, 2010 in Phoenix, Arizona. (John Moore/Getty)

President Barack Obama will meet with Arizona Governor Jan Brewer today. The president opposes Arizona's controversial immigration law, signed by the governor, which is due to take effect next month. 

But sentiment may be growing to support the kind of harsh anti-immigrant legislation seen Arizona.  Similar legislation has been introduced in four other states, including South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Minnesota.  And in Massachusetts, the Senate recently passed a measure that would further restrict illegal immigrants’ access to state benefits.  The Takeaway speaks to Ann Morse, Program Director of the Immigrant Policy Project at The National Conference of State Legislatures, and Adam Reilly, from WGBH’s daily public affairs television program, Greater Boston.

Guests:

Ann Morse and Adam Reilly

Produced by:

Elizabeth Ross

Comments [1]

Kristina from Phoenix, AZ

The crucial thing we should consider while fighting against illegal immigration is the illegal labor. People pass the border illegally because they are guaranteed to get a job here!!! So first of all entrepreneurs should stop taking illegal employees, using cheap labor and increasing their profits. And the situation will change drastically!!! What will illegals come for if they know that there is no job here for them!

Want to share your thoughts - speak up at http://immigration.civiltalks.com/

Jun. 03 2010 09:23 AM

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