Even with insufficient postage, USPS must deliver absentee ballots

Friday, October 24, 2008

More voters are sending in absentee ballots in 2008 as a way to beat the lines on Election Day. But some absentee voters are worried that if their ballots are sent with the wrong postage, they'll be returned, meaning their votes won't count. The Takeaway finds out what happens to a ballot with insufficient postage.

Guests:

Ruth, Mike Cannone, Bob Shaw and Linda Weintraub

Contributors:

Jen Poyant

Comments [4]

James

There is no such position in the San Diego Post Office as a corporate communications director in San Diego. Someone promoted themselves to a non existent position

Dec. 20 2008 01:10 PM
Micelle

I put three stamps on my ballot just be sure. In 2000, I was away in NC for college and I voted by absentee but I was sure I did it correctly. It was a push pin ballot. In 2004, on the very last day of early voting, I satyed in line for 4 hours! So this year I did absentee. In the next round of elections, unfortunately, I know I'll be in & out of there in 10 minutes at the most.

Oct. 31 2008 09:50 AM
Josh

Get a grip dude. In some states and counties, the absentee ballot weighs more than one ounce, therefore requiring 59 cents postage. In some cases, such as Orange County Florida, the absentee ballots were mailed with literature requesting insufficient postage. They insist the post office will deliver ballots anyway, but with so many ridiculous voting issues in Florida in the past, I would not be surprised if this becomes an issue on Election Day.

Oct. 28 2008 11:38 PM
Pk Trepp

It will never cease to amaze me how damned, near, stupid the American "voter" can be. Postage? Postage???? ----It's 42 cents, people!

Oct. 27 2008 02:06 PM

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