Mark Twain's Autobiography To Be Published 100 Years After Death

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Author Mark Twain once wrote, “It is no use to keep private information which you can't show off.”  Twain, whose given name was Samuel Clemens, will finally show off his most private information 100 years after his death, with the publication of his autobiography.

The author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn wrote the manuscript for his autobiography, but left explicit instructions that it not be published until a century after his death.  That time has now come, and the University of California, Berkeley (which has had possession of the manuscript in a vault) will release the first of three volumes of the great American writer's autobiography this fall. We talk with Bob Hirst, general editor of The Mark Twain Project at U.C. Berkeley's Bancroft Library. Hirst has worked for five years to prepare the autobiography for publication.  Although he admits there will be no new revelations about Twain's life, the book does include personal information such as Twain's opinions about politics at the time.  Hirst says the new tome will "be an enlightening experience, once people read it." We also hear from Steve Courtney, publicist for The Mark Twain House, in Hartford, Connecticut.

 

Guests:

Steve Courtney and Bob Hirst

Produced by:

Amanda Moore

Comments [3]

Jan from Massachusetts

Takeaway,
Please, PLEASE do a followup on this story, and give us the ISBN when the first volume comes out!

And tell us when the other two volumes are scheduled to be released!

Jul. 02 2010 02:32 PM

Parts of his autobiography have been published, but it was never published in its entirety.

http://bit.ly/bQVS9U

So the big news here is that the whole shebang will be available this fall.

May. 26 2010 08:26 AM
Ed from Larchmont

There is an autobiography published in 1924 by Harpers, how are they related?

May. 26 2010 08:06 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.