Disabled Students More Likely to Face Corporal Punishment

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

A new report by the ACLU and Human Rights Watch says that children with disabilities are more likely to face corporal punishment in school than their peers. We talk to Alice Farmer, a lawyer with the ACLU, and Anna Moore, the mother of a 10-year-old boy with autism.

Guests:

Alice Farmer and Anna Moore

Contributors:

Noel King

Comments [6]

I know from Oklahoma

I know of a school right here in Oklahoma who uses corporal punishment (paddling) on a consistent basis. My son's friend gets paddled at least once a week at the Liberty Hills Middle School.

When I went to sign my son up for school, I was asked to sign a consent form to allow this punishment to be used on my son; of course I declined to sign such a consent form.

And I've seen plenty of abuse of autistic children and other disabled children. Tons of it. It needs to stop. And as for calling this mom "distraught," wouldn't YOU be if your son or daughter were not only physically restrained but also physically abused enough to receive a busted lip? I know I would be... still I didn't hear a "distraught" mother sensationalizing her son's story. Sorry... you're off-base on that one.

May. 28 2010 01:45 AM
Josh

I think Anna Moore is nothing but con artist looking to make a buck off an over blown incident that DID not result in abuse but did ruin the carrer of a good man. Frank loves the children and has many supporters who know the TRUTH. Anna spins her web of lies around the internet looking for anyone who will believe her little story. But the sad thing is she is using credible people to boost her creidbility. BEWARE of ANNA MOORE.

Dec. 23 2009 11:13 AM
Kent Adams

@ Mr. Vaccari

"I know of no school"
"much more likely sustained"

Mr. Vaccari has no facts but speculation yet he claims bias on the reporters part?

and then he goes on to make speculative accusations against a disabled child -

"They were more likely sustained by an autistic child who had to be restrained for his own protection!"

Who's got the bias here?

Aug. 12 2009 06:37 AM
anny

My daughter was restrained and left with bruises, her only crime or behavior... Crying. Crying because her Parapro was making her write when she couldn't, putting a child with a normal IQ with children with low iq's because they would not accommodate her needs. They had taken her computer away, her books on tape, segregated her away from her friends without disabilities. She was tiny and no threat to anyone. The bruises heal, but the trauma of being mishandled has left her with no trust and a diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. She was a child who was medically fragile, with a heart condition, bleeding disorder and they restrained her in front of 700 students moving her from a seclusion room all because of crying quietly.

Aug. 11 2009 11:41 PM
DisabledinAmerica

The ACLU released their report on Coporal Punishment in schools today. Restraining is part of corporal punishment & part of the report. The whole point of the report was to make those such as yourself who are unaware, aware! This parent didnt come across distraught at all. Were you listening or only hearing what you want to hear?

Aug. 11 2009 04:20 PM
Michael Vaccari

Terrible one-sided reporting! I know of no school that practices corporal punishment, even if allowed. Your story allows a biased lawyer to mention "paddling" even though it was admittedly not involved in this instance! You allow a distraught mother to discribe injuries much more luridly than they probably were. The injuries were not even "punishment!" They were more likely sustained by an autistic child who had to be restrained for his own protection! You did not interview his teacher, nor an administratopr familiar with the case. You, like most media, were only interested in the sensationalism of the story!

Aug. 11 2009 11:34 AM

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