A closer look at school governance under mayoral control

Monday, April 13, 2009

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently advocated in favor of mayoral control of big-city schools. It is a system that is already in cities such as New York, Boston, and Chicago and Los Angeles, Dallas, and Newark are considering making the move. Is this growing trend good for the students? So far test results show that students aren't necessarily doing better in schools run by mayors. Here to help us take a closer look at the pros and cons of school governance is Joseph Viteritti, professor at Hunter College and editor of When Mayors Take Charge.

Listen to Educator-in-Chief Arne Duncan's interview on The Takeaway.

Who runs your school system? Tell us here!

Guests:

Joseph Viteritti

Hosted by:

Femi Oke and Todd Zwillich

Comments [1]

Jamie Avery lcsw

If the public were to take the time to understand underlying issues when they choose a stance to either support or rail up against the Mayor on the issue of “Mayoral Control”, would the opposition be so fierce?
Subsequent to 40 years of operation under its own devise and agency, the BOE saw needed reforms, when Bloomberg took office. Mayoral Control is the mayor’s right to oversee and maintain an authoritative presence over city agencies. Lindsay rescinded Mayoral Control seeking to resolve the problem of its bureaucracy amidst new legislation for decentralization resulting in ousting 19 Jewish educators in Brownsville. Far from providing appropriate resolution, it developed a patronage hiring system,compromising itself and the individuals it seeks to serve.Lines of authority were confused, and illogical.Bureaucratic layers multiplied rather than decreased. Dismantling the BOE has had major ramifications in eliminating a wasteful, inefficient and fraudulent bureaucracy.

Aug. 26 2009 11:47 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.