Christmas Gifts Gone Wild

Friday, December 12, 2008

Takeaway culture correspondent Mary Elizabeth Williams looks off the beaten track to find you some of the coolest Christmas gifts around.
Polaroid PoGo
The Poloroid PoGo is an instant mobile phone printer. The Pogo lets you share digital photos straight from your camera cell phone or digital camera. $100 from Best Buy and other electrical good stores.

bacon brittle
Bacon Brittle
This is a really nuts gift! Bacon Brittle is an outrageous mix of peanut brittle, bacon and tasty pecans. The candies come in two sizes, a half-pound bag ($14.95) and a full-pound bag ($21.95) for real piggies.

spy

spy
Spy Gear
Unleash the inner spy in your child with a selection of spy toys that would make James Bond's gadget man "Q" green with envy. The great thing about these toys is that girls love them as much as boys. Night Goggles, $19.95; Spy Video ATV-360, $129.95.

roberto bolano
Roberto Bolano's 2666
Don't be the last to read Bolano's novel 2666. The Chilean author and poet died at age 50 in 2003, just after he finished the book that critics now rave about. The huge epic novel has just been translated into English. It shows the horrors of twentieth-century life through a series of serial murders set on the border of the United States and Mexico. $30 from Powell's and other bookstores.

Contributors:

Femi Oke and Mary Elizabeth Williams

Comments [5]

sherry

I found the quote from the person at Powell offensive. Very unpleasant start to my day.

Dec. 12 2008 06:28 PM
Roger Sayre

The best gift my wife, Christy, ever gave me was a coupon for one home-made pie a month for a year. At minimal cost, I had a delicious treat, made with love, to look forward to all year long. That warm, "Christmas feeling" was revived over and over and every Pie Day was like a new celebration.

Roger Sayre
Jersey City, NJ

Dec. 12 2008 09:14 AM
Linda Gnat-Mullin

For my nearest and dearest, I found local restaurant coupons in a special promotion on a college savings site, and included "co-pay" money, since a minimum cash purchase is required. Each family enjoys several nice dinners out, the restaurants, typically small merchants, have potential new customers, and my son gets college savings.

For our former au pairs now back in Europe, I made origami ornaments out of old Christmas cards and metallic thread. They came out great, and I sent them off packed flat inside pretty new greeting cards, adding our own warm sentiments.

I'm trying new recipes for "gifting" various holiday gatherings, including homemade candied orange peel, made from the fresh peels of organic oranges.
You'd be amazed at what you can do with a little patience and resourcefulness. Try it! That's half the fun of the holidays this year.

Dec. 12 2008 08:36 AM
Judith Rycar

I really appreciated your story about holiday gifts and your mention of ETSY for purchasing handmade gifts. Don't forget to tell your listeners that they can buy wonderful handmade gifts at local craft fairs and church/ synagogue bazaars, or even make some themselves! Over the years I have gifted family and friends with sewn, embroidered, and other crafted gifts. This year some of my gifts will be handmade jewelry, scrapbooks and plastic canvas creations. DIY isn't just for house projects! Keep up the good work and happy holidays to all of you at The Takeaway.

Dec. 12 2008 07:48 AM
Anne F.

Thank you so much for stressing that we don't have to go to princess town for our kids. My girls are 2 & 6 and they're getting scooters, balance bikes & art supplies.

Nothing wrong with a little pink, but the segregation in the toystores & on the websites makes my heart sing.

Now, off to order that bacon brittle...

Dec. 12 2008 06:58 AM

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