Calling All Guinea Pigs: Volunteer for the H1N1 Trials

Thursday, July 23, 2009

The U.S. government is seeking thousands of volunteers, from babies to the elderly, to roll up their sleeves for the first clinical trials of an H1N1 flu vaccine. The race is on to test whether a new vaccine really will protect against this virus before its expected rebound in the fall. Will the vaccines work? Will there be enough vaccines for everyone? What are the dangers of the vaccine itself? The Takeaway talks to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which will oversee the trials.

"We think the risk is extremely small because we give tens of millions of doses of seasonal flu vaccine every year to adults, the elderly and children, and there's not a significant, at all, degree of adverse effects."
—Dr. Anthony Fauci on the H1N1 vaccine

Guests:

Dr. Anthony Fauci

Hosted by:

Farai Chideya and Lynn Sherr

Contributors:

Sitara Nieves

Comments [1]

Jodi Sullivan

Dr. Andrew Fauci, put your money where your mouth is. Would you agree to inject yourself with the same amount of vaccinations/body mass that are given to our babies? Anyone remotely into self preservation and the viable life of their babies should never inject another single vaccination into their systems, let alone be a human guinea pig. Dr. Andrew Moulden @ www.brainguardmd.com, has irrefutable proof that all vaccinations have adverse effects on the body and he has measured and documented the proof. Simply put, vaccinations cause blood sludging. Sludging of the blood causes strokes/death to living tissues. He has proven that immediately after vaccinations, there are stroke like systems in infants through adults. These strokes are happening all over the body, but can be directly measured in changes to eye position/movement, mouth drooping, and nasal fold asymmentry. Get educated, and save a life.

Aug. 28 2009 10:45 PM

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