An NYC Bomber Still Uncaught

Thursday, May 06, 2010

While we're all celebrating the capture of the alleged would-be Times Square bomber, there's story of another bomber that has been lost in the mix. This bomber successfully detonated a bomber in Times Square, in front of an army recruiting station back in 2008. He is also suspected of setting off explosives in front of the U.K. and Mexican Consulates in New York City. Why has this man not been caught? WNYC's Bob Hennelly has been following this story and knows the answer.

Guests:

Bob Hennelly

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [1]

George Prans from ECE Dept. Manhattan College

In support of the present system of Times Square cameras (some of your callers were asking for a perfect crime-preventing system):

• A high-resolution, real-time, human-monitored camera system would be impractical for the constant human scrutiny needed over so many cameras… and still would not be able to allow instantaneous reaction to prevent a crime…it would only observe it.

• A high-resolution, non-manned camera system would swamp our digital memory resources

• Our present medium-resolution, non-manned cameras can be helpful for following a suspect until perhaps she/he passes a close-up camera in a store/storefront, etc. Even though almost any camera system will not prevent a crime, they can be especially useful in preventing other crimes by a serial criminal by helping to track that person.

• The midtown license-plate readers (like the ones which allow ticketing red-light beaters) promoted by the Mayor would be useful.

George Prans
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Manhattan College

May. 06 2010 07:55 AM

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