Volcanic Ash Cloud Causes Historic Airport Shutdown in Europe

Friday, April 16, 2010

A massive cloud of ashes has kept thousands of fligfhts on the ground in Northern Europe yesterday after a volcano in Iceland erupted a second time this month, spewing huge amounts of silicate ash into a busy airspace for travellers in the region. Some of Europe's busiest airports have closed down in what appears to be the biggest shutdown of flights since 9/11.

Charisse Jones is an airline industry reporter for USA Today. She tells us that it the mass shutdown of airports in Europe is unprecendented. We also talk with Dr. Matthew Roberts, a glaciologist working at the Icelandic Meteorological Office, who flew over the volcano last night. 

Guests:

Charisse Jones and Dr. Matthew Roberts

Produced by:

Marine Olivesi

Comments [1]

Ranjan Sharma from Vienna (currently)

The thousands of passengers who are stuck somewhere away from home would appreciate if they are kept informed of the process which is being followed to determine how long the planes will be kept away from air. Is there any study being made on the ppm levels in the air? If yes, can it be disclosed? Also, what is the effect on blades of engines of planes which flew with no passengers? There is no informed discussion anywhere on this.

Apr. 18 2010 10:49 AM

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